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Re: [IPk] holidays

Dear Pat

Re your message to Collette - you talk about taking pump supplies in checked
luggage ie the hold so it may freeze.  Is it OK for the reservoirs and
infusion sets to freeze?  I just wondered about the reservoirs which have
sticky stuff on the shaft will this come to any harm?

Useful information about travel.  I have just been to Tenerife with the pump
for the first time.  I did not have any trouble with the pump or supplies, no
one noticed them or commented at the airport either end.

Heather Gibbs

----- Original Message -----
From: Pat Reynolds
Sent: 01 October 2002 08:44
To: email @ redacted
Subject: Re: [IPk] holidays

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Dear Collette,

I'm surprised there isn't a page on the ip-uk site ... perhaps this
could form the basis for one?

If you wear a pump visibly, you can expect it to be treated as a pager:
you'll be asked to take it off.  You should explain that it is a piece
of medical equipment, and that it can go through the security arch.

The security arch will not necessarily pick up the pump. If the pump has
been noticed by the security staff, or picked up by the arch, you should
explain that it is an insulin pump.  Security staff may wish to make a
visual inspection of the infusion site (in private), ask you to take the
pump out of the case, frisk you with their hands or with a detector
'wand', or simply wish you a pleasant flight.

For details of what documentation you need to take with you, etc.: Link
needed to the US dept of Transport site, plus:
'Some countries follow older, less secure standards than the US.  For
these, rather than packaged insulin, you need a letter from your doctor
stating that you use an insulin pump, and listing the equipment that

You are advised to contact the airport and airline before flying: if you
want to do this, be prepared to get wrong advice back.  If you think you
might want to sue later, write without mentioning the date or time of
your flight. [That's my advice, anyway - others may have more trust in
the airports and airlines.  I wrote seven airports, and only Denver
replied, telling me I should put all my medication in the hold ...].

There should be a paragraph on 'medication':

Insulin does not freeze!  Air baggage can be frozen, so you need to keep
all your insulin in your hand baggage.  In case of theft, you should
split the insulin between two bags (preferably one carried by a
companion, if you are not travelling alone).  Carry plenty of pump
supplies, emergency syringes, etc. with you.  Also carry pump supplies
and syringes in your checked baggage.  DO NOT tell anyone you are
carrying syringes or pump supplies: they are not among the 'sharp
objects' you are supposed to mention at check-in.  If you tell someone
at check-in that you are carrying syringes, the worst that can happen is
that a terrorist can overhear you.  Slightly less bad, you can get
hassle.  It is highly unlikely that your diabetic equipment will mean
that your bag is picked out from x-ray, but if it is, or if it is
randomly searched, the advice of the US website, plus letter from doctor
for less security-minded countries applies.

*Sun and Beach*
[I'm fuzzy on what to give as advice here - not being a lying on the
beach person - I remember some posts about pale patches .... could
something be assembled from them???] Stuff about keeping the pump cool.
In California, drying off in the sun after a swim, I put mine under a
towel where it was nice and cool.

*Taking a Pump 'Holiday'*
Some people, either due to worries about sun or sand, or not wanting to
be hooking and unhooking all the time while dipping in and out of a
pool, take a 'pump holiday': going back to injections for boluses during
the day.  The day basal needs are covered by mini-injections during the
day. Or some people switch back to mdi completely.  This should be
discussed with your diabetes nurse, if you want to try it.

*Time Zones*
Some people cross time zones the way other people commute, others find
that they need to be very careful in their adjustment to the new time.
There are various ways that people reset their basals on long trips
[should be possible to cobble them together from previous posts] but the
underlying message is: your body is going to be different to everyone
else's, so plan to measure your bg a lot during the first couple of
days, and perhaps be cautious about treating unexpected highs.

Best wishes,

(dm 30+, 508 1+, really good at taking holidays!)

In message <email @ redacted>, email @ redacted writes
>we are going on holiday during the half term to Tenerife.  My daughter has
>been on the  508 minimed now for 10 weeks.  Does anyone have any holiday
>information sheets on what problems etc to look out for on the pump? Or does
>anyone know a web site address which will have that information?  Also should
>she disconnect from the pump when walking through the Security gate or just
>go through and not say anything?
>for HELP or to subscribe/unsubscribe, contact: HELP@insulin-pumpers.org
>help SUPPORT Insulin Pumpers http://www.insulin-pumpers.org/donate.shtml

Pat Reynolds
email @ redacted
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