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Re: [IPk] Gluten free foods



Elizabeth wrote
> I'm with Di on this one: look at this as an opportunity rather than a
> restriction. You should check in with a good whole foods shop for advice
and
> try to broaden the diet. For example, you can eat barley, buckwheat (which
> isn't wheat at all and is gluten free), millet, and probably a few things
I
> can't think of (stay ways from bulgar and cous couse - they're both wheat
> products). Get some recipes for corn bread. And try squash instead of
> potatoes! They're my favourite thing in autumn: some of them are quite
sweet
> in flavour, such as butternut. Use them instead of poatoes. They add great
> colour to the plate.


I think that with four children I have not been very adventurous with
cooking and will have to try other things.  I have tried dry fruits in the
past with only limited success.  I will try again.
Trouble is I think habits start years ago and Terry (my husband) didnt like
rice or things like beans so you tend to cook things that you both eat so
that when kids come along you are still eating the same stuff and they don't
get chance to try things and when they do its yuck, if you're not careful.
I will get my cook books out and start trying.  We have had a couple of
nearly GF days.



> For snacks, why not try dried fruit? You can measure it at home and have a
> different one each day. Monday is raisins, Tuesday is apricots, etc. I
also
> highly recommend nine bars (http://www.hemp.co.uk/barinfo.html), which, as
> far as I recall, are gluten free, and have a number of different seeds in
> them. They are in a glucose base and have a bit of carob or chocolate on
the
> top. They are _delicious_! I think it's 16g per bar or so, so you could
cut
> one in half if necessary. Yum. Because of the sweetness I think they'd
suit
> a child's palate - and they're a lot healthier than bikkies.



I will try some of these sorts of things in very near future.



> I suppose if you can present new foods with excitement you can get the
girls
> to try them, at least. Can you turn your culinary experiments into
> adventures? Perhaps you could set up a rating chart, and everyone could
try
> the new food and then rate it from one to five (you pick which is the top
> score). Then the ones that score the highest (say, all fours and fives if
> five is best) get eaten again. It's the Mary Poppins approach, really: if
we
> make a game of it it won't hurt at all.

I think that this is a brilliant idea.  I will get organised and make a
chart and we will try different foods and I will get the twins and perhaps
the older girls to fill in a chart.  Then they will at least try stuff if I
am getting them to test.  I will let you know how it goes on.

If it is successful I will pass the idea on to the dietician at the
hospital.



Jackie
PS you sound as though you speak from experience.  Do you have children??











> elizabeth
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