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[IPk] Re: ip-uk-digest V1 #430



A few thoughts from a relative beginner with a medical background...
We all have a circadian rhythm, whereby different hormone and steroid
influences come into play at different times of the day. When I first
started pump therapy, I was given a "flat rate", and now realise why I had
hypos and hypers at certain times with both injected and pump insulin,
because the hourly basal rate varies five-fold!  I need far more insulin at
certain times of the day, for example during the afternoon and 12 hours
later, than at evening and waking up time.
Another factor to add to an already complicated equation, but is it the case
that x units insulin at y hours has a different effect from x units of
insulin at z hours?  (i.e., it's not only the amount of carbo you eat that
needs to be taken into consideration, but also the "time of day"
ratio...help!!)
----- Original Message -----
From: ip-uk-digest <email @ redacted>
To: <email @ redacted>
Sent: Wednesday, February 21, 2001 3:47 PM
Subject: ip-uk-digest V1 #430


>
> ip-uk-digest       Wednesday, February 21 2001       Volume 01 : Number
430
>
>
>
> PLEASE edit the subject line of your reply messages.
> ####################################################
> This issue of the digest contains:
> [IPk] Bad night hypo
> Re: [IPk] Bad night hypo
> Re: [IPk] Bad night hypo
> Re: [IPk] Bad night hypo
> Re: [IPk] Bad night hypo
> Re: [IPk] Bad night hypo
> [IPk] Beware the bath!
> [IPn] Let's be nice please
> [IPk] Hypo
> Re: [IPk] Bad night hypo
> Re: [IPk] Beware the bath!
> Re: [IPk] Beware the bath!
> Re: [IPk] Bad night hypo
> Re: [IPk] Bad night hypo
> Re: [IPk] Bad night hypo
> Re: [IPk] Bad night hypo
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Date: Tue, 20 Feb 2001 16:45:08 +0100
> From: John Neale <email @ redacted>
> Subject: [IPk] Bad night hypo
>
> Sigh. It was my turn last night for the stonking hypo. I think I see what
I
> did wrong, which is one minor consolation. My wife Julia had baked a large
> and delicious apple pie last night, of which I ate plenty, and bolused
> accordingly. When I went to bed at 11:30pm, my bg was 12. Ah. I'd
> underestimated the carb content. I take 1 unit for every 2.5 I wish to
> reduce my bg, so I took 2.5 units of insulin and went off to sleep. Woke
at
> 8am feeling very wierd. Throbbing headache and felt sick. I was barely
> compos mentis, so I took 2 paracetamol, checked my bg which was 4.2, and
> went back to sleep. I had a free morning so that was OK. Slept soundly and
> woke at 1pm. Bg 12. Moderate to high ketones in urine. But felt fine -
> headache and sickness gone. Since then my bg has been highish all day.
>
> My guess is that my bedtime bg was not entirely due to lack of insulin,
but
> simply miss timing - the humalog was coming through slower than the apple
> pie. So the bedtime correction bolus simply caused a hypo later in the
> night. And I should have been much more careful: perhaps one unit would
> have been sufficient. And perhaps I should have set my alarm for 3am to
> check what was happening, but, well, a solid night's sleep seems so much
> more desirable than waking at 3am :-| Till you have a bad hypo...
>
> John
>
> - --
> mailto:email @ redacted
> http://www.webshowcase.net/johnneale
> - ----------------------------------------------------------
> for HELP or to subscribe/unsubscribe, contact: HELP@insulin-pumpers.org
> help SUPPORT Insulin Pumpers http://www.insulin-pumpers.org/donate.shtml
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Tue, 20 Feb 2001 15:56:20 +0000
> From: Diana Maynard <email @ redacted>
> Subject: Re: [IPk] Bad night hypo
>
> On Tue, 20 Feb 2001, you wrote:
> >Sigh. It was my turn last night for the stonking hypo.
> - ---->big snip
> >My guess is that my bedtime bg was not entirely due to lack of insulin,
but
> >simply miss timing - the humalog was coming through slower than the apple
> >pie. So the bedtime correction bolus simply caused a hypo later in the
> >night. And I should have been much more careful: perhaps one unit would
> >have been sufficient. And perhaps I should have set my alarm for 3am to
> >check what was happening, but, well, a solid night's sleep seems so much
> >more desirable than waking at 3am :-| Till you have a bad hypo...
> >
> >John
>
> I've had similar experiences - I've bolused at bedtime because my Bg is
> high, and not considered that it might be mistiming rather than too little
> insulin.
> That's led me to an interesting observation - or at least, supposition.
> If I eat late at night and take insulin to match, I tend to wake up high
in
> the night. I always assumed that this was because my insulin works less
> tively at night than during the day (maybe because I'm less active when
I'm
> asleep). But....if I bolus a correction dose late at night, for something
> I've eaten several hours previously, this insulin seems to be absorbed
just
> as well as it normally would. So my theory is that it's not the insulin
> working less efficiently at night, but that it's the food which gets
> digested at a slower rate overnight (hence the insulin runs out before the
> food).  Elizabeth, I think you had a similar theory about insulin being
> less efficient at night. Perhaps it's the same for you with food???
>
> Di
> - ----------------------------------------------------------
> for HELP or to subscribe/unsubscribe, contact: HELP@insulin-pumpers.org
> help SUPPORT Insulin Pumpers http://www.insulin-pumpers.org/donate.shtml
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Tue, 20 Feb 2001 15:57:44 +0000
> From: email @ redacted
> Subject: Re: [IPk] Bad night hypo
>
> So what is the definition of a hypo? Is it under 4 mmol? Or does everyone
> define them differently? Are you assuming you had been lower than 4.2
> during the night?
>
> elizabeth
> - ----------------------------------------------------------
> for HELP or to subscribe/unsubscribe, contact: HELP@insulin-pumpers.org
> help SUPPORT Insulin Pumpers http://www.insulin-pumpers.org/donate.shtml
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Tue, 20 Feb 2001 16:46:11 -0000
> From: "Ingrid Morrow" <email @ redacted>
> Subject: Re: [IPk] Bad night hypo
>
> Di
>
> I get this too.
>
> If I work late, or gym late, I will quite often go to bed high.  I
sometimes
> take a correction dose, and that is when I run into trouble (ie hypos!)
>
> In the past I finished work much earlier, so there was a greater gap
between
> eating and bed, and my level just before sleeep was much better.
>
> I don't know if I should just leave things when I go to bed high, set the
> alarm to wake up at 3am (which Peter would love!), or risk hypoing (which
> will wake Peter anyway!).
>
> maybe I just need to get organised and eat earlier!
>
> Ingrid
>
> PS  I know too that my insulin doesn't work as well at night.  I don't
think
> this is just a dm thing either.  Quite often dietitians suggest that you
> should actually have your main meal at lunch, because our bodies just
aren't
> as efficient at nighttime!
>
>
>
>
> >From: Diana Maynard <email @ redacted>
> >Reply-To: email @ redacted
> >To: email @ redacted
> >Subject: Re: [IPk] Bad night hypo
> >Date: Tue, 20 Feb 2001 15:56:20 +0000
> >
> >On Tue, 20 Feb 2001, you wrote:
> > >Sigh. It was my turn last night for the stonking hypo.
> >---->big snip
> > >My guess is that my bedtime bg was not entirely due to lack of insulin,
> >but
> > >simply miss timing - the humalog was coming through slower than the
apple
> > >pie. So the bedtime correction bolus simply caused a hypo later in the
> > >night. And I should have been much more careful: perhaps one unit would
> > >have been sufficient. And perhaps I should have set my alarm for 3am to
> > >check what was happening, but, well, a solid night's sleep seems so
much
> > >more desirable than waking at 3am :-| Till you have a bad hypo...
> > >
> > >John
> >
> >I've had similar experiences - I've bolused at bedtime because my Bg is
> >high, and not considered that it might be mistiming rather than too
little
> >insulin.
> >That's led me to an interesting observation - or at least, supposition.
> >If I eat late at night and take insulin to match, I tend to wake up high
in
> >the night. I always assumed that this was because my insulin works less
> >tively at night than during the day (maybe because I'm less active when
I'm
> >asleep). But....if I bolus a correction dose late at night, for something
> >I've eaten several hours previously, this insulin seems to be absorbed
just
> >as well as it normally would. So my theory is that it's not the insulin
> >working less efficiently at night, but that it's the food which gets
> >digested at a slower rate overnight (hence the insulin runs out before
the
> >food).  Elizabeth, I think you had a similar theory about insulin being
> >less efficient at night. Perhaps it's the same for you with food???
> >
> >Di
> >----------------------------------------------------------
> >for HELP or to subscribe/unsubscribe, contact: HELP@insulin-pumpers.org
> >help SUPPORT Insulin Pumpers http://www.insulin-pumpers.org/donate.shtml
>
> _________________________________________________________________________
> Get Your Private, Free E-mail from MSN Hotmail at http://www.hotmail.com.
> - ----------------------------------------------------------
> for HELP or to subscribe/unsubscribe, contact: HELP@insulin-pumpers.org
> help SUPPORT Insulin Pumpers http://www.insulin-pumpers.org/donate.shtml
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Tue, 20 Feb 2001 16:47:30 -0000
> From: "Ingrid Morrow" <email @ redacted>
> Subject: Re: [IPk] Bad night hypo
>
> My definition depends on the time of day.  During the day, I think
anything
> less than about 3.5 - 3.8 is getting a bit low, but I know I will hypo in
> the night (and wake up high!) if I go to bed lower than about 6.
>
>
>
> Ingrid
>
> >From: email @ redacted
> >Reply-To: email @ redacted
> >To: email @ redacted
> >Subject: Re: [IPk] Bad night hypo
> >Date: Tue, 20 Feb 2001 15:57:44 +0000
> >
> >So what is the definition of a hypo? Is it under 4 mmol? Or does everyone
> >define them differently? Are you assuming you had been lower than 4.2
> >during the night?
> >
> >elizabeth
> >----------------------------------------------------------
> >for HELP or to subscribe/unsubscribe, contact: HELP@insulin-pumpers.org
> >help SUPPORT Insulin Pumpers http://www.insulin-pumpers.org/donate.shtml
>
> _________________________________________________________________________
> Get Your Private, Free E-mail from MSN Hotmail at http://www.hotmail.com.
> - ----------------------------------------------------------
> for HELP or to subscribe/unsubscribe, contact: HELP@insulin-pumpers.org
> help SUPPORT Insulin Pumpers http://www.insulin-pumpers.org/donate.shtml
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Tue, 20 Feb 2001 19:15:07 +0100
> From: John Neale <email @ redacted>
> Subject: Re: [IPk] Bad night hypo
>
> >So what is the definition of a hypo? Is it under 4 mmol? Or does everyone
> >define them differently?
>
> We're all different, but for me anything below 4.0 is hypo, and I treat
> straight away.
>
> I know some people (not me) report occasionally feeling hypo symptoms at
> much higher levels, which suggests a falling bg is causing the symptoms,
> rather than a low level. Clearly taking glucose by mouth stops the
> symptoms, which is what you want. My Canadian friend who recently had the
> baby told me how she's cycled to the baby group after breakfast, and felt
> really hypo when she arrived, so she checked her bg and it was 8 or 9.
This
> suprised her greatly. But she took glucose none the less and felt better
in
> a few minutes.
>
> >Are you assuming you had been lower than 4.2
> >during the night?
>
> Yes I am. Waking with a hypo-headache and ketones and a bg of 4.2 suggests
> I had been lower, and then rebounded to 12 by lunchtime.
>
> John
>
> - --
> mailto:email @ redacted
> http://www.webshowcase.net/johnneale
> - ----------------------------------------------------------
> for HELP or to subscribe/unsubscribe, contact: HELP@insulin-pumpers.org
> help SUPPORT Insulin Pumpers http://www.insulin-pumpers.org/donate.shtml
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Tue, 20 Feb 2001 21:02:19 -0000
> From: "Jennifer Carter" <email @ redacted>
> Subject: [IPk] Beware the bath!
>
> Thanks to whoever it was mentioned
> hot water increasing the absorption of insulin.
> My daughter felt very strange after a bath
> this morning - and I discounted it -
> but on her second complaint of being
> sick and dizzy did a routine test -
> because of hearing the above comment -
> and she was below 3.  No wonder
> she felt bad.
>
>  The only explanation was that the hot
> water in the bath speeded up the absorption
> of the bolus she had just taken!
>
> Thanks to whoever gave the warning -
> that was a close one.
>
> Jennifer
> - ----------------------------------------------------------
> for HELP or to subscribe/unsubscribe, contact: HELP@insulin-pumpers.org
> help SUPPORT Insulin Pumpers http://www.insulin-pumpers.org/donate.shtml
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Tue, 20 Feb 2001 17:41:16 -0800
> From: "Michael" <email @ redacted>
> Subject: [IPn] Let's be nice please
>
> Fellow list mates,
>
> Please, it does none of us any good to get into arguments about how
> generous one should be or why you should or should not support this
> forum. Please don't flame. I appreciate all your efforts to help with
> fund raising but this is purely a voluntary thing. Let us not demean
> the intent and purpose of Insulin Pumpers with noise about who should
> and should not donate.
>
> For those of you that do not think you can or should give. So be it.
> For those of you that help to support our forum, you have my thanks
> and the thanks of all who benefit from this resource.
>
> I know that fund raising is tedious, repetitive and annoying, but it
> is an unfortunately necessity until my rich uncle dies or Bill Gates
> leaves a sack of gold on the doorstep.
>
> I want to thank the many donors who have pooled their contributions
> to match the $400 challenge from Friday... AND announce the LAST and
> only remaining challenge that I have for this fund drive.
>
> From Canada, weighing in at $125, this contender challenges you to
> come up with matching funds to bring the total to $250.00
>
> So far we've managed to raise $5597 dollars toward our quarterly goal
> of $6000 --- Matching the $125 challenge will put us at $5847.00,
> just inches from the finish line and this pesky funding drive can be
> put to SLEEP.  Please be generous and we'll be done for a while.
>
> To see the progress of this funding drive, visit the Thank You page of
> the web site and view the chart at the bottom.
>
> http://www.insulin-pumpers.org/donors.shtml
>
> Where to Contribute.
> For single and recurring donations use the Insulin Pumpers donor page
> at:
>
> http://www.insulin-pumpers.org/donate.shtml
>
> For Challenges, use the Insulin Pumpers challenge gift page at:
>
> http://www.insulin-pumpers.org/grant.shtml
>
> OR, mail your check to:
>
> Insulin Pumpers
> 4600 El Camino Real - Suite 206B
> Los Altos, CA 94022
>
> In the UK,  <=====
> for tax deductible donation, use your charity
> card and/or contribute to the CAF (Charities Aid Foundation) on
> behalf of Insulin Pumpers, CAF charity #002139. See
>
> http://www.givingtoday.org/charitycard.cfm
>
> or call 0800 99 33 11 for details.
>
> My Very Best Regards,
>
> Michael Robinton
> Executive Director
> email @ redacted
> Insulin Pumpers web site http://www.insulin-pumpers.org
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 21 Feb 2001 08:55:47 -0000
> From: "Kentish, Julette" <email @ redacted>
> Subject: [IPk] Hypo
>
> Generally we (at BDEC - diabetes centre) would suggest you treat any BGL
> below 4.0mmol/L as a hypo - regardless of symptoms or not. Hopefully
> this will help your awareness of hypos so you don't drop to 2.2 before
> you feel it. There is some medical evidence out there that suggests that
> your cognitive function (awareness, ability to contemplate it and
> provide action) decreases on it when you are going hypo (even around say
> 3.8).
> Many people feel hypo much higher than this, particularly when they have
> had BGL at a much higher level. Additionally some people feel hypo when
> their BGL drop very quickly - even when they are not "medically" hypo.
> Hope it helps!
> Julette kentish
> Diabetes Research Dietitian
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: John Neale [mailto:email @ redacted]
> Sent: 20 February 2001 18:15
> To: email @ redacted
> Subject: Re: [IPk] Bad night hypo
>
> >So what is the definition of a hypo? Is it under 4
> mmol? Or does everyone
> >define them differently?
>
> We're all different, but for me anything below 4.0 is
> hypo, and I treat
> straight away.
>
> I know some people (not me) report occasionally feeling
> hypo symptoms at
> much higher levels, which suggests a falling bg is
> causing the symptoms,
> rather than a low level. Clearly taking glucose by mouth
> stops the
> symptoms, which is what you want. My Canadian friend who
> recently had the
> baby told me how she's cycled to the baby group after
> breakfast, and felt
> really hypo when she arrived, so she checked her bg and
> it was 8 or 9. This
> suprised her greatly. But she took glucose none the less
> and felt better in
> a few minutes.
>
>
> - ----------------------------------------------------------
> for HELP or to subscribe/unsubscribe, contact: HELP@insulin-pumpers.org
> help SUPPORT Insulin Pumpers http://www.insulin-pumpers.org/donate.shtml
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 21 Feb 2001 11:35:00 +0000
> From: Diana Maynard <email @ redacted>
> Subject: Re: [IPk] Bad night hypo
>
> On Tue, 20 Feb 2001, you wrote:
> >Di
> >
> >I get this too.
> >
> >If I work late, or gym late, I will quite often go to bed high.  I
sometimes
> >take a correction dose, and that is when I run into trouble (ie hypos!)
> >
> >In the past I finished work much earlier, so there was a greater gap
between
> >eating and bed, and my level just before sleeep was much better.
> >
> >I don't know if I should just leave things when I go to bed high, set the
> >alarm to wake up at 3am (which Peter would love!), or risk hypoing (which
> >will wake Peter anyway!).
>
> >maybe I just need to get organised and eat earlier!
>
> Can't you take a smaller correction dose when you go to bed high?
> If you can't now, that's one thing you will be able to do on the  pump.
>
> Or try experimenting with the carbs/fat/protein of what you eat when it's
> late. I try and eat ,ostly salad/veggies and some protein rather than
carbs
> if I eat late (often not till near midnight when I get home from my dance
> class).
>
>  >Ingrid > >PS  I know too that my insulin doesn't work as well at
> night.  I don't think  >this is just a dm thing either.  Quite often
> dietitians suggest that you  >should actually have your main meal at
lunch,
> because our bodies just aren't  >as efficient at nighttime!
>
> But isn't that a food digestion thing rather than an insulin production
> thing?
> Di
> - ----------------------------------------------------------
> for HELP or to subscribe/unsubscribe, contact: HELP@insulin-pumpers.org
> help SUPPORT Insulin Pumpers http://www.insulin-pumpers.org/donate.shtml
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 21 Feb 2001 12:02:04 +0100
> From: John Neale <email @ redacted>
> Subject: Re: [IPk] Beware the bath!
>
> >Thanks to whoever it was mentioned
> >hot water increasing the absorption of insulin.
>
> Anyone know if this "bathtime hypo" is a recent phenomenon? I know
nothing,
> but I do wonder if it is related to Humalog? Or to human insulin? Does it
> happen with pork insulin or Velosulin? Or am I becoming more meticulous
> with my control - knowing what my bg is more often, being closer to 4 than
> 14?
>
> But I do find myself now having showers more often than baths.
>
> John
>
> - --
> mailto:email @ redacted
> http://www.webshowcase.net/johnneale
> - ----------------------------------------------------------
> for HELP or to subscribe/unsubscribe, contact: HELP@insulin-pumpers.org
> help SUPPORT Insulin Pumpers http://www.insulin-pumpers.org/donate.shtml
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 21 Feb 2001 12:25:23 +0000
> From: Diana Maynard <email @ redacted>
> Subject: Re: [IPk] Beware the bath!
>
> On Wed, 21 Feb 2001, you wrote:
> >>Thanks to whoever it was mentioned
> >>hot water increasing the absorption of insulin.
> >
> >Anyone know if this "bathtime hypo" is a recent phenomenon? I know
nothing,
> >but I do wonder if it is related to Humalog? Or to human insulin? Does it
> >happen with pork insulin or Velosulin? Or am I becoming more meticulous
> >with my control - knowing what my bg is more often, being closer to 4
than
> >14?
>
> Don't think so - I've always noticed it. Nothing odd about it - heat
speeds
> up insulin absorption. Hot baths, sunbathing, saunas, massage etc. can all
> make you go low, especially if you've recently injected / bolused. I
notice
> it more now because my BG is generally lower, but I noticed it even 20
> years ago on the old pork and beef insulins. And I know several people
> who've taken their injection, had a bath and then passed out from  a
hypo -
> before Humalog was around. Of course, the fast-acting nature of Humalog
> makes it even more likely to happen.
> Di
> - ----------------------------------------------------------
> for HELP or to subscribe/unsubscribe, contact: HELP@insulin-pumpers.org
> help SUPPORT Insulin Pumpers http://www.insulin-pumpers.org/donate.shtml
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 21 Feb 2001 13:11:02 -0000
> From: "Ingrid Morrow" <email @ redacted>
> Subject: Re: [IPk] Bad night hypo
>
> I only take a correction dosage of 1-2 units anyway, and my second point
was
> meant to be a general non-dm thing (I don't believe in blaming EVERYTHING
on
> dm!)
>
>
> Ingrid
>
> >From: Diana Maynard <email @ redacted>
> >Reply-To: email @ redacted
> >To: email @ redacted
> >Subject: Re: [IPk] Bad night hypo
> >Date: Wed, 21 Feb 2001 11:35:00 +0000
> >
> >On Tue, 20 Feb 2001, you wrote:
> > >Di
> > >
> > >I get this too.
> > >
> > >If I work late, or gym late, I will quite often go to bed high.  I
> >sometimes
> > >take a correction dose, and that is when I run into trouble (ie hypos!)
> > >
> > >In the past I finished work much earlier, so there was a greater gap
> >between
> > >eating and bed, and my level just before sleeep was much better.
> > >
> > >I don't know if I should just leave things when I go to bed high, set
the
> > >alarm to wake up at 3am (which Peter would love!), or risk hypoing
(which
> > >will wake Peter anyway!).
> >
> > >maybe I just need to get organised and eat earlier!
> >
> >Can't you take a smaller correction dose when you go to bed high?
> >If you can't now, that's one thing you will be able to do on the  pump.
> >
> >Or try experimenting with the carbs/fat/protein of what you eat when it's
> >late. I try and eat ,ostly salad/veggies and some protein rather than
carbs
> >if I eat late (often not till near midnight when I get home from my dance
> >class).
> >
> >  >Ingrid > >PS  I know too that my insulin doesn't work as well at
> >night.  I don't think  >this is just a dm thing either.  Quite often
> >dietitians suggest that you  >should actually have your main meal at
lunch,
> >because our bodies just aren't  >as efficient at nighttime!
> >
> >But isn't that a food digestion thing rather than an insulin production
> >thing?
> >Di
> >----------------------------------------------------------
> >for HELP or to subscribe/unsubscribe, contact: HELP@insulin-pumpers.org
> >help SUPPORT Insulin Pumpers http://www.insulin-pumpers.org/donate.shtml
>
> _________________________________________________________________________
> Get Your Private, Free E-mail from MSN Hotmail at http://www.hotmail.com.
> - ----------------------------------------------------------
> for HELP or to subscribe/unsubscribe, contact: HELP@insulin-pumpers.org
> help SUPPORT Insulin Pumpers http://www.insulin-pumpers.org/donate.shtml
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 21 Feb 2001 13:53:35 +0000
> From: Diana Maynard <email @ redacted>
> Subject: Re: [IPk] Bad night hypo
>
> On Wed, 21 Feb 2001, you wrote:
> >I only take a correction dosage of 1-2 units anyway, and my second point
was
> >meant to be a general non-dm thing (I don't believe in blaming EVERYTHING
on
> >dm!)
> >Ingrid
>
>  >>  PS  I know too that my insulin doesn't work as
> well at >>night.  I don't think  >this is just a dm thing either.  Quite
> often >>dietitians suggest that you  >should actually have your main meal
at
> lunch, >>because our bodies just aren't  >as efficient at nighttime! >
>
> Hi Ingrid
> Well, once you get a pump you'll be able to take say half the correction
> dose, which might solve the problem. I know that doesn't help much now
> though......
>
> As for your second point, I thought you were suggesting that  insulin
> doesn't  work as well at night in non-Dm as well as DM people - ie it's
not
> a DM thing. In which case I was suggesting that it might be the carb
> absorption rather than the insulin effectiveness which isn't so good at
> night (in  non-Dmers too) - which is why the dieticians suggest eating
main
> meal at lunchtime. If that's not what you meant, sorry.
>
> Di
> - ----------------------------------------------------------
> for HELP or to subscribe/unsubscribe, contact: HELP@insulin-pumpers.org
> help SUPPORT Insulin Pumpers http://www.insulin-pumpers.org/donate.shtml
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 21 Feb 2001 14:44:29 -0000
> From: "Ingrid Morrow" <email @ redacted>
> Subject: Re: [IPk] Bad night hypo
>
> And it's not just the size of the correction dosage you can give yourself
> that causes problems, it's knowing how much to give!
>
> Pity the pump doesn't solve that one......
>
> >From: Diana Maynard <email @ redacted>
> >Reply-To: email @ redacted
> >To: email @ redacted
> >Subject: Re: [IPk] Bad night hypo
> >Date: Wed, 21 Feb 2001 13:53:35 +0000
> >
> >On Wed, 21 Feb 2001, you wrote:
> > >I only take a correction dosage of 1-2 units anyway, and my second
point
> >was
> > >meant to be a general non-dm thing (I don't believe in blaming
EVERYTHING
> >on
> > >dm!)
> > >Ingrid
> >
> >  >>  PS  I know too that my insulin doesn't work as
> >well at >>night.  I don't think  >this is just a dm thing either.  Quite
> >often >>dietitians suggest that you  >should actually have your main meal
> >at
> >lunch, >>because our bodies just aren't  >as efficient at nighttime! >
> >
> >Hi Ingrid
> >Well, once you get a pump you'll be able to take say half the correction
> >dose, which might solve the problem. I know that doesn't help much now
> >though......
> >
> >As for your second point, I thought you were suggesting that  insulin
> >doesn't  work as well at night in non-Dm as well as DM people - ie it's
not
> >a DM thing. In which case I was suggesting that it might be the carb
> >absorption rather than the insulin effectiveness which isn't so good at
> >night (in  non-Dmers too) - which is why the dieticians suggest eating
main
> >meal at lunchtime. If that's not what you meant, sorry.
> >
> >Di
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> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 21 Feb 2001 15:48:41 +0000
> From: Diana Maynard <email @ redacted>
> Subject: Re: [IPk] Bad night hypo
>
> On Wed, 21 Feb 2001, you wrote:
> >And it's not just the size of the correction dosage you can give yourself
> >that causes problems, it's knowing how much to give!
> >
> >Pity the pump doesn't solve that one......
>
> Well, if you know how many mmol/l a unit of insulin will lower your BG by,
> you can figure it out easily enough. And if you don't know, you can easily
> test it yourself and see....
> Di
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>
> ------------------------------
>
> End of ip-uk-digest V1 #430
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