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Re: [IPk] bg testing in schools



Hi Paul

We live in Essex (like you I think?): Eleanor was diagnosed last year (in
Year 3) and has always tested bgs in class.  She has always been responsible
for her own tests and the advice I have given the school is that if she
cannot test her self she is extremely low and they must treat as a severe
hypo without delay.
The children do move around the school for Maths and English setting,
assembly and the like so she has boxes containing glucose tablets, 150ml
cans of regular pop, Lucozade, hypostop, instructions and emergency contact
numbers in the two First Aid rooms and her classroom. She has a One touch
Ultra blood testing kit and a Medisense Optium meter for ketones which are
kept in the class teacher's desk. She is supposed to take the kits with her
wherever she goes but sometimes forgets and then someone is sent to get them
for her if she is hypo.
I went into the class with Ruby Bear at the start of the school year to
explain about Diabetes including testing/hypos/snacks/injections(as Eleanor
injects at lunchtime) and we talked about not bugging Eleanor when she is
testing or eating in class. Now no one bats an eyelid if Eleanor does a test
in class and they all know to call an adult if Eleanor seems 'odd'.
The only 'issue' about testing in class was that as Eleanor tests several
times at school the strips tend to fall out of the case so the teacher has
provided her with an old film canister to put the used strips into. The
school were mildly anxious about her doing injections at school but we all
agreed that Eleanor was best to do them in the First Aid room so that she
has privacy and the sharps are contained in one room. She has a sharps box
there to put the pen needles in afterwards. Actually I think they were most
worried about the mobile she has to call me about her  lunchtime insulin
dose, as students are not allowed mobiles in school (also has  to be kept in
the First Aid room!).
Hope this helps
Liz mum of Eleanor 9 dx 11/02 (on lantus x1 and Novorapid x 3 & aspiring
pumper), Hannah 6 (dairy and  soya intolerant) and George 3 (dairy, soya and
gluten intolerant)


----- Original Message -----
From: "sam and paul hawkins" <email @ redacted>
To: <email @ redacted>
Cc: "sam hawkins" <email @ redacted>
Sent: 11 December 2003 17:44
Subject: RE: [IPk] bg testing in schools


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> Your donation of $10, $25, or more... just $1 or $2 per month is
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> of the diabetes community. Please visit:
>
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>
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>
> Dear all,
>
> I have just had a meeting at Amy's school with the head teacher,
apparently
> Amy took it upon herself to do a blood glucose test in the class
> room(nothing to do with me). There was a supply teacher today who
obviously
> did not know the rules on bg testing at Amy's school. She felt a bit dizzy
> and asked the teacher if she could test, the teacher said yes. This time
Amy
> was 14.1 and went along to the medical room for a glass of water. she met
> the head and he asked her where she had done the test.
>
> That's when I got a call.
>
> We had a good chat about diabetes as his wife has diabetes and is also a
> teacher at the school. I asked him where his wife tests if she feels
unwell
> and he told me that she kept her meter in the staff room. I said that she
> might want to re-think that considering how important it is to deal with a
> hypo as quickly as possible. He said he will think about  bg testing in
the
> class and let me know after xmas. I did make the point that Amy was not to
> go anywhere if she is low and that recovery treatment must be brought to
the
> her in the future. I don't know what they are going to do if Amy feels ill
> before xmas, we will have to wait and see.
>
> I felt that the meeting was productive and that the head did listen to my
> concerns. His concerns about bg testing in the classroom were that
children
> may lose concentration and be more interested in Amy then on what they
> should be doing. I said that there may be an initial reaction but after a
> while this would die down and that the kids would just accept that this
was
> something that Amy had to do to manage her condition and probably wouldn't
> notice her doing bg tests after a while.
>
> His other concern was blood in the classroom and all that goes with that.
I
> said that as his wife tests her glucose he should know that it only takes
a
> small amount of blood to test and that if Amy conducted a test at the back
> of the class no one would come into contact with any. I said that someone
> falling over in the play ground and cutting their leg would produce much
> more blood than a bg test. I also mentioned that we change lancets at home
> before school and when she gets home from school so sharp points would not
> be an issue.
>
> I informed him that other schools do allow bg tests in the classroom, I
> would like to know the names of these schools so that he can get in touch
> with them if he so wishes.
>
> I do hope that the head makes a sensible decision, I must say that overall
> he is an excellent head who has been very supportive in other on going
> issues that Amy has at school.
>
> As Amy has always done bg testing in the medical room, bg testing in the
> classroom is a new issue for him.
>
> I would value any advice on this topic in case we have to take this matter
> further.
>
> Paul Hawkins dad to Amy aged 9 dx @6 and Thomas aged 9
>
>
>
>
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: email @ redacted [mailto:email @ redacted]On
> Behalf Of email @ redacted
> Sent: 10 December 2003 20:41
> To: email @ redacted
> Subject: Re: [IPk] bg testing in schools
>
>
> Insulin Pumpers is made possible by your tax deductible contributions.
> Your donation of $10, $25, or more... just $1 or $2 per month is
> needed so that Insulin Pumpers can continue to serve you and the rest
> of the diabetes community. Please visit:
>
>     http://www.insulin-pumpers.org/donate.shtml
>
> Your annual contribution will eliminate this header from your IP mail
>
> Paul
>
> I would agree with much of what Jackie has said about testing in the
>  classroom. I think that you should speak to the Head and ask why Amy is
not
> allowed to
> test in the classroom. Try and get a very clear answer with the specifics.
> Chances are that the school simple doesn't understand what a blood test
> really
>  involves. And I think that Ian's comment is wrong; nobody is asking the
> teacher
> to take responsibility for Amy's diabetes. If they still insist about not
>  letting her test in class or cannot give you a clear and reasonable
> explanation
> for the ban, then ask about their policy on disability. They cannot
>  discriminate against children with disabilities. They should have a
policy
> on
> equal
>  opportunities for all. Ask the Head what he/she thinks the impression the
> other
> kids in the class get when they see a person with diabetes having to leave
> the
>  room to do something that is part of the person's treatment, especially
> since
> it
> is something that can be done discreetly.
>
> Ken
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