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Re: [IPk] talking about diabetes



I have been with the same boyfriend for the last 14 years (in fact living
together now and have two children) but I am still not sure how much of my
diabetes he understands or should I say, wants to understand.  Don't know
about any other boyfriends but mine seems not to be able to fully understand
or want to anything medical.  I think if you find a boyfriend that is
interested it can only be a good thing.

Trisha
----- Original Message -----
From: "Sarah" <email @ redacted>
To: <email @ redacted>
Sent: Tuesday, August 26, 2003 9:38 PM
Subject: [IPk] talking about diabetes


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>
> What I tend to do is just explain what I'm doing at the time (if it's
> convenient!). Like if I went out for a meal, I would say why I was
bolusing
> and that I counted roughly the carbs in the meal to work out how much
> insulin I needed. If we were going for a walk I would reduce my basal rate
> and say why. etc etc. I find this approach best as I am a very open
person,
> and I want people I know well to understand about my diabetes. Being open
> means they can ask questions and don't feel afraid as they can see you
know
> what you're doing. It's also important, as you point out, not to bombard
> someone with info - I always reckon it's better to tell someone about
> diabetes in little chunks over a longer period of time than all at once
and
> have them not understand most of it or even worse not tell them at all.
Over
> time, for me, diabetes goes back to being discrete. I test my BGs and
bolus
> but don't really talk about it (although my boyf still asks the odd
> question - usually about how I sort out my boluses and basals when we go
out
> for a drink). It seems to work. Inevitably you have to defend why you have
a
> pump too which for me usually involves drawing pics but I guess it depends
> on you and the other person. You are completely right that keeping quiet
is
> not the way to go :)
> About being dependent on a box 24h a day - I can completely sympathise
with
> that. It was my reaction when my consultant first suggested a pump. I
don't
> really know whether other people understand how valuable being in control
> is, and that it is worth the inconvenience of having a pump. I guess all
you
> can do is try to explain!
> Good luck Di - hope it goes well,
> Sarah
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: email @ redacted [mailto:email @ redacted]On
> Behalf Of Diana Maynard
> Sent: 26 August 2003 21:14
> To: email @ redacted
> Subject: Re: [IPk] daily mail
>
>
> Insulin Pumpers is made possible by your tax deductible contributions.
> Your donation of $10, $25, or more... just $1 or $2 per month is
> needed so that Insulin Pumpers can continue to serve you and the rest
> of the diabetes community. Please visit:
>
>     http://www.insulin-pumpers.org/donate.shtml
>
> Your annual contribution will eliminate this header from your IP mail
>
> somehow it seems more dramatic to talk about the horrors of injecting. I
>   don't know why. On the subject of fears of collapsing etc, I'm in th
> eawkward position of trying to explain to a new boyfriend about diabetes
> and insulin pumps etc. We've been through the "so where does your pump
> go in" thing, and I've just given him the very brief lowdown on hypos
> and what to do in the event that I have a bad hypo. I've never really
> worried about the whole "being attached to a pump 24 hours a day" thing
> because it never bothered me, but presumably that's something that might
> bother other people? What else about diabetes / insulin pumps would you
> tell someone in the first instance? In the past I've always kept quiet
> about pretty much everything to do with diabetes, but I've learnt that
> that's not really the best way to go....
> Di
>
>
> Abigail King wrote:
>
> > Haven't read it but would be interested
>  > It's funny isn't it. These articles are always entitled " the horrors
of
> daily
> > injections" or " the torture of blood glucose tests" but when discussing
> the
> > broader aspects of diabetes they blithely mention that the person can
not
> be
>  > kept waiting for meals or that the person may occasionally slip into a
> coma
> or
> > have a fit due to hypoglycaemia. As if the latter don't really matter.
If
> I
> > was told I had to do 8 injections per day or 20 blood glucose tests I
> would
> > mind less than if I was told to expect to collapse every so often or
> > subordinate my entire life to the disease eg not eat out with friends in
> case
> > of being kept waiting etc. If I was told the latter I would probabley
slit
> my
> > throat...
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