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RE: [IPk] Re: ip-uk-digest V1 #230



Pat - you are right - counting carbohydrates is only one way to manage
your diabetes. Fat and firbe anecdotally have a role to play as does the
type of insulin you are on and its interaction with the glycaemic index.
Alcohol and exercise also throw a spanner into the works - as does
digestion rates and type of additives eaten (eg: spices etc..). I would
generally work on the premise of carb counting but taking note of all
these other factors. Your ratio seems to alter during the day at times
(unless you finely adjust your basal rate). There are so many factors in
the mix - I think it is better to treat the individual and also consider
weight  - which is where the calories comes in. But self-experience is
the best from your diabetes. julette :)

> -----Original Message-----
> From:	Pat Reynolds [SMTP:email @ redacted]
> Sent:	13 April 2000 22:50
> To:	email @ redacted
> Subject:	Re: [IPk] Re: ip-uk-digest V1 #230
> 
> I am not a dietician, and this is probably heresy:
> 
> Counting carbos is only one way to skin the cat (so to speak).
> 
> Another way to do it is to count calories.  Instead of working out a
> carb-to-insulin ratio, and keeping the proportion of carbs-to-calories
> as steady as your body says you have to, you can work a calories-to-
> insulin ratio, and keep the carbs-to-calories as steady as your body
> says you have to.
> 
> About keeping the ratio steady: you may find that if you eat 400 cals,
> and 10% comes from carbs, you need a very different amount and/or time
> of insulin to if you eat 400 cals, but 80% comes from carbs. (Ain't
> life
> grand?) If you find you _are_ sensitive to the carb/cal ratio (or to
> certain kinds of food such as oats or alcohol) you can either
> eliminate
> the problem (by keeping the ratio the same, avoiding foods, etc), or
> you
> can take the time to experiment and learn what to do to avoid
> problems.
> Neither is the 'right answer': both, or some way between is 'a right
> answer' for _you_ (your body, and your preferred lifestyle).  
> 
> The advantage of the pump (and I'm still a wannabe) is that you can
> match the insulin to your lifestyle, rather than vice versa.  So if
> you
> (and your healthcare professionals) are happy with your diet (sounds
> like a tropical diet to me - fruit, perhaps a little fibrous root
> material, and the rest of the calories from fat and protein) why
> aren't
> you fitting your insulin to your food, rather than about-facing it in
> this way?
> 
> Best wishes,
> -- 
> Pat Reynolds
> email @ redacted
>    "It might look a bit messy now, but just you come back in 500 years
> time" 
>    (T. Pratchett)
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