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Re: [IPp] Middle of the Night Checks?



I agree here, many many times over the past 8 years I
have gone to my son's room and found him sweating and
his bg was low or dropping.  I can't feel comfortable
counting on his body reserves of stored insulin to
pull him out of a bad hypo. What would happen if his
body had no extra stored sugars to release? I don't
want to find out.
Susanne
mom to jessica 13 ryan 9 diagnosed 17 months,(pumping
as of Monday!) rebecca 7 and justin 4.
--- Michael <email @ redacted> wrote:
> > > If a low does knock them out and they have no
> assistance they will
> > probably
> > > come to and recover from it  naturally in a few
> hours after the insulin
> > > wears off (or in the case of a pumper - after
> the Auto-Off shuts the pump
> > > down). On the other hand if they got knocked out
> by an uncontrolled high
> > > (DKA, etc.) and did not receive external
> assistance then they would not
> > > recover. So by my book night time lows are not
> that frightening.
> > 
> > 
> 
> I have to disagree a bit here. I've checked my
> daughter in the middle 
> of the night for years and once came in to find her
> in mild 
> convulsions with blood drooling down the side of her
> face. This is 
> not a scene that a parent wants to see -- trust me
> on that one. There 
> are real dangers involved. A couple of years ago a
> preteen was found 
> "dead in bed" by her mother after a hypo in the
> night -- it was 
> reported here by one of the list members. The child
> was not a pumper, 
> but that is not really the point. She was a type one
> and went low on 
> her regular dose of insulin and died. Lots of things
> don't work right 
> when you turn off energy to the brain. Simple things
> like sleeping 
> with your head up on a pillow can cut off the airway
> when normal 
> sleeping reflexs fail to make you breath or turn
> over.
> 
> I don't mean to be an alarmist, but making the
> assumption that 
> "everything will be alright" is not something I'm
> comfortable with 
> when it is MY CHILD that might die if I am not
> vigilant. Sure, once 
> in eight years is a pretty good record for low's
> that require 
> assistance in the night, but once is all it takes. I
> have awakend her 
> many time in the night to find her at 50 or lower
> and on the way 
> down. What might have happened all those other times
> when it took 100 
> - 200 grams of carb to stabilize her bg's?
> 
> Michael (fanatic parent)
> email @ redacted
>
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=====
Susanne~mom to Jessica 13, Ryan 9 diagnosed at 17 months, Rebecca 7 & Justin 4.

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