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Re: [IP] Recommended Disconnecting Pump for takeoff and landing



only if you can climb 8000 feet in about 5 minutes.  Otherwise the effect
takes so long, you can ignore it.  



>________________________________
> From: Richard <email @ redacted>
>To: "email @ redacted" <email @ redacted>
>Sent: Thursday, March 13, 2014 10:24 AM
>Subject: Re: [IP] Recommended Disconnecting Pump for takeoff and landing
>
>
>Does this also apply to mountain climbers?
>
>Richard
>
>Sent from my iPad
>
>> On Mar 13, 2014, at 8:15 AM, Denise Danielson
<email @ redacted>
>wrote:
>>
>> I spoke to a rep from Asante and they told me all insulin pumps should be
>> disconnected before take off and landing.  I've never known about before
and
>> wondered if everyone does this?   Here is what is in our user manual
>> concerning traveling by air: Air Travel  When traveling by airplane,
>> disconnect the infusion set from yourbody during takeoff and landing. As
with
>> any insulin pump, during takeoff thepressure change in the cabin will
cause
>> any air bubbles in the cartridge andinfusion set to expand. If you fail to
>> disconnect, the expanding bubbles will pushinsulin into your body and lead
to
>> potential overdelivery. By disconnecting theinfusion set before takeoff
and
>> keeping it disconnected until after the plane reachescruising altitude,
you
>> can avoid any inadvertent delivery caused by the change inair pressure.
>During
>> landing, air bubbles will contract back to their original size asair
pressure
>> returns to normal. By disconnecting the infusion set and priming
untildrops
>> appear, you can account for the bubble shrinkage and avoid potential
>> missedinsulin delivery.Before reattaching the infusion set to your body,
>> perform a tubing prime of at least2 units and observe drops exiting the
>> infusion set. The change in altitude mayincrease the likelihood of bubble
>> formation. Therefore, it is important to check forbubbles frequently
during
>> and after air travel. Be sure to check your BG frequentlyduring air
travel,
>> particularly after takeoff and landing.  Once again thank you for your
>> interest in Snap and please let us know if we can be of further
assistance.
>>
>> Denise D.
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>> From: email @ redacted
>>> To: email @ redacted
>>> Subject: RE: [IP] Re: Disconnecting Pump for takeoff and landing
>>> Date: Thu, 13 Mar 2014 14:58:32 +0000
>>>
>>> I only had an issue once, and that was when I took 11 flights over 2 days
>>> (requalifying for elite status - lol). I was consistently high those
days,
>> but I
>>> attributed it to the alcohol I was drinking on the plane.
>>>
>>> This is certainly an interesting article, and something someone who has a
>> high
>>> insulin sensitivity factor should keep in mind.
>>> ________________________________________
>>> From: email @ redacted
>> <email @ redacted>
>>> on behalf of Susan Marshall <email @ redacted>
>>> Sent: Tuesday, March 11, 2014 4:15 PM
>>> To: email @ redacted
>>> Subject: [IP] Re: Disconnecting Pump for takeoff and landing
>>>
>>> Denise, I never disconnect before the flight or during landing and
takeoff.
>>> Never had any problems! I fly often.
>>>
>>>
>>> Susan
>>> T1 for 60 years, with no complications!
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>.
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