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Re: [IPu] Continuous BG monitoring



>From what I gather (and I haven't been able to talk to a hospital contact
yet), it isn't a wrist one but rather a machine slighter larger than the pump,
that is inserted by a nurse educator into the abdomen (again like the pump).
It takes readings every 5 minutes for 3 days (so I will be wearing 2 machines
for that time!) and after removal the readings are downloaded on a computer,
graphed out and sent back to the Dr. (I can't see the readings while they are
being taken).

I'm hoping that it too will sort out my night time basal rates. One of the
reasons I went on the pump is that it was suspected I dropped too low during
the night, sleeping through it, and rebounding anywhere between 15 and 20 in
the morning (leaving me with a bad headache, blurred vision and feeling weak
and tired all day). The pump has certainly improved that, but I'm hoping the
monitor will help me refine my night basals with more confidence. (At the
moment I know I'm running too high overnight, but I'm too scared to increase
the insulin in case I return to the days of sleeping through hypo's.)

Lynette Wamsteker
  ----- Original Message -----
  From: Alan Reed
  To: email @ redacted
  Sent: Friday, March 15, 2002 4:48 PM
  Subject: Re: [IPu] Continuous BG monitoring


  Anne,
  Take it up with your Hospital contacts. It might be worth taking it up
first
  with the MiniMed contact as they supply the machines and get some
  information you could pass on if the Hospital don't have it.
  Alan.
  ----- Original Message -----
  From: "tazzie" <email @ redacted>
  To: <email @ redacted>
  Sent: Friday, March 15, 2002 4:22 PM
  Subject: Re: [IPu] Continuous BG monitoring


  > ----- Original Message -----
  > From: "Alan Reed"
  > Sent: Friday, March 15, 2002 8:41 AM
  > Subject: Re: [IPu] Continuous BG monitoring
  >
  >
  > > Lynette,
  > > Re Continuous BG monitoring whilst I have not been tested with it the
  > > general feeling is that it is a very useful tool for checking that your
  > > basals and testing routine is sound. There are some questions raised re
  > the
  > > accuracy of the results obtained but they are more than accurate enough
  to
  > > give valuable confirmation, or otherwise, re for example your overnight
  > > Basals. People who have been tested have frequently found that they
have
  > > been going low or high during the night and have slept through it.
  >
  > Night time seems to be the time I am most inconsistant so it sounds like
a
  > great way to see what is happening.
  > A few nights this week I have gone low around 3 am then  up to around 13
  by
  > 7 am.  Annoying considering I have been able to get much better morning
  > results since using the pump.  I have altered my night basals and today I
  > was 4.5 at 6am, so hopefully I have them set ok now:-]
  >
  > > The one disadvantage is that you have to wear it on your wrist
virtually
  > 24
  > > hours a day and you cannot just look  at it to see what your BG is.
  >
  > So how does this work, when and how do you get the results?
  >
  > Anne Type 1, 11 years
  > Pumper 10 Months
  >
  > > Alan Reed.
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