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[IPu] Fw: [IPp] Adult Spleen Cells Demonstrate Regenerative Properties



>From the POP list ... although the same heading these 2 emails are separate.
Janette

----- Original Message ----- 
From: "Rachel A" <email @ redacted>
To: "Rachel A" <email @ redacted>
Sent: Friday, January 21, 2005 8:22 AM
Subject: [IPp] Adult Spleen Cells Demonstrate Regenerative Properties


>
 >
http://home.businesswire.com/portal/site/google/index.jsp?ndmViewId=news_view&newsId=20050119005788&newsLang=en
>
> January 19, 2005 06:00 PM US Eastern Timezone
>
> Adult Spleen Cells Demonstrate Regenerative Properties Associated with
> Embryonic Stem Cells
>
> BOSTON--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Jan. 19, 2005--The Iacocca Foundation announced 
> today
> an update on work conducted at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) and 
> funded
> by the Iacocca Foundation to investigate the regenerative capabilities of 
> adult
> stem cells in the spleen. In 2003, MGH researchers discovered that the 
> spleen
> might be a source of adult stem cells that could regenerate the
> insulin-producing islets of the pancreas. In a follow-up to that 
> unexpected
> finding, members of the same team now report that these potential adult 
> stem
> cells in the spleen produce a protein previously believed to be present 
> only
> during the embryonic development of mammals. Dr. Faustman and her 
> colleagues
> reported the results in an article in the January 19th issue of SAGE KE
> (http://sageke.sciencemag.org/), an online resource on the science of 
> aging from
> the publishers of the journal Science.
>
>
>
> "There may be a previously undiscovered pocket of primitive stem cells in 
> the
> spleen that are important for healing several types of damage or injury," 
> says
> Denise Faustman, MD, PhD, director of the MGH Immunobiology Laboratory,
> associate professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School and senior 
> author of
> the SAGE KE report. "If so, these cells could have much broader 
> therapeutic
> applications than suggested by our earlier work. For now we are focused on 
> the
> role these adult stem cells could play in treating reversing type 1 
> diabetes."
>
> The first phase of a clinical trial to study the role of pancreatic islet
> regeneration after elimination of autoimmune disease as a way to reverse 
> type 1
> diabetes is underway at MGH. This work is being funded by the Iacocca 
> Foundation
> alongside a nationwide initiative, JoinLeeNow (www.joinleenow.org), 
> spearheaded
> by Lee Iacocca to raise the funds necessary to complete the clinical 
> trials.
>
> In 2001, Denise Faustman's team found that a treatment designed to address 
> the
> autoimmune reaction underlying type 1 diabetes actually cured the disease 
> in
> diabetic mice. Late in 2003, they reported the mechanism behind the 
> earlier
> discovery: cells from the spleens of donor mice -- intended to train the
> diabetic animals' immune systems not to attack islet cells -- were 
> actually
> producing new islets. The result suggested that the spleen -- previously
> regarded as playing a fairly minor role in stem cells for blood -- might 
> contain
> a population of potential islet stem cells. In their pursuit of that 
> finding,
> the MGH researchers investigated the possible presence of a protein called 
> Hox11
> in these cells. In mammals, Hox11 is a controller of key steps in 
> embryonic
> development -- including the formation of the spleen -- but it was not 
> known to
> be present in adults under normal circumstances. In some other animals, 
> however,
> the protein has an intriguing function: when creatures lik!
> e newts
> regenerate a lost limb or tail, production of Hox11 is radically 
> increased.
>
> "We know that if you have a major loss of blood, the spleen is turned on 
> to
> supplement the bone marrow in replenishing your blood supply. We may find 
> that
> the spleen kicks in to help with many more biological emergencies. What 
> has been
> considered a practically unnecessary organ may actually provide critical 
> healing
> cells," says Faustman.
>
> Co-authors of the SAGE KE report are first author Shohta Kodama, MD, PhD, 
> of
> the MGH Immunobiology Laboratory, and Miriam Davis, PhD, of George 
> Washington
> University. For more information on Massachusetts General hospital and Dr.
> Faustman please contact Sue McGreevey at (617) 724-2764.
>
> About the Iacocca Foundation
>
> With the proceeds of his best-selling autobiography, Lee A. Iacocca 
> established
> the Iacocca Foundation in 1984 in honor of his late wife, Mary K. Iacocca, 
> who
> died from complications of type 1 diabetes. The Foundation continues to 
> receive
> all royalties from both of Mr. Iacocca's best-selling books. Since 1984, 
> the
> Iacocca Foundation has given more than $20 million to diabetes research. 
> More
> information is available at www.iacoccafoundation.org.
>
>
> Rachel - "I would rather live my life as if there is a God, and die to 
> find out
> there isn't, than live my life as if there isn't, and die to find out 
> there is."
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