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RE: [IP] Re: insulin-pumpers-digest V7 #523DEAR ABBY



They truly had a wonderful article a number of years ago on the subject of
mood swings in diabetics. To put it simply, if I remember correctly, the
brain runs off of glucose and oxygen.
Too much glucose, or not enough, causes a few little minor problems with how
the brain works....
been there too....

Margo

-----Original Message-----
From: email @ redacted
[mailto:email @ redacted]On Behalf Of michelle
Sent: Wednesday, September 10, 2003 5:56 AM
To: email @ redacted
Subject: [IP] Re: insulin-pumpers-digest V7 #523DEAR ABBY


Dear Abby
I read this article and it made me so mad.  My son has T1 diabetes and when
his BS is high, he is completely not himself!  He is moody, grumpy, and when
his BS soars to 400 or above he becomes combative and will not remember any
of his actions when his numbers return to normal.  One particular episode
included my husband and I trying to hold him down and give him an injection
when his BS was over 600 while he was hitting and kicking his and punching
holes in the walls of his bedroom (sheetrock).  When we finally called EMS
and found a way to restrain him and get insulin into him and his BS returned
to normal, he did not know how his holes got in his wall and why we were all
so exhausted.  My husband and I then made him fix the walls and then we
re-wallpapered them for him as a treat because we knew it really wasn't his
fault that his #s went that high, he was coming down with an illness and
none of us saw it coming.  So anyone who says that BS can't cause behavior
change has obviously not lived with someone with D.
Michelle
mom of Ryan 16yo dx 2/00 pumping 9/02
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Tue, 9 Sep 2003 15:34:44 -0700 (PDT)
> From: Heidi Vogan <email @ redacted>
> Subject: [IP] Dear Abby-In defense of my endocrinologist
>
> In defense of Dr.Barrett's letter,
>
> http://www.siliconvalley.com/mld/mercurynews/living/6395563.htm
>   I don't feel he is implying that people with
>  diabetes
>  never get emotionally upset due to the effects of
>  the
>  disease. "Wants a life in Virginia's" husband was
>  obviosly on a downhill slide,even before he went
>  into
>  complete denial,quitting his medication + diabetes
>  care.Diabetes may have made such behavior worse,but
>  did not cause it.(as Dr.Barrett stated-"does not
>  come
>  about".) Her husband has been abusing his body for
>  his
>  entire life,being diagnosed made him a "more votile
>  person that he was before.."(according to her
>  letter)I
>  know that diabetes can cause depression, and in some
>  circumstances(due to high or low blood sugars) all
>  out
>  aggression,I've experienced that.And no doubt not
>  treating the diabetes did make the guy more nuts..On
>  a final note,Dr.Barrett is my physician + a fine one
>  at that,he understands the emotional issues but he
> also knows the difference between the diseise's
> effects,and
>  something else.And from this lady's letter,pinning
>  the
>  blame on diabetes is nuts.
>                    Heidi
>
>  --- margo2 <email @ redacted> wrote:
>  > Dr. Barrett needs to read many of the past
> > articles
> > > on mood-swings, caused
> > > by blood glucose swings, in diabetes magazines I
> > > think.
> > >
> > > Margo
> >
> >
> > __________________________________
> > Do you Yahoo!?
> > Yahoo! SiteBuilder - Free, easy-to-use web site
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>
>
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> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Tue, 09 Sep 2003 18:53:30 -0400
> From: Judith Renwick <email @ redacted>
> Subject: [IP] Precision strips
>
> Sorry to say that the Precision QID and Precision Xtra do not use the same
> glucose test strips.
>
> Very sad story about that boy - but unfortunately true in many, many
places
> in the world today.  Our group, Diabetes Youth Foundation of Indiana, has
> had a program helping Russian teens for 10 years.  We've expanded it to
> include kids from other parts of the former Soviet Union.  In the smaller
> towns and countryside, kids are often unable to get decent insulin, and
> strips are a real luxury for most.  As terrible as it is for a child to
> have diabetes in the US, it's many times worse in other parts of the
world.
>
> Judith
>
>
>
>
> - ---------------------------------------------------------------------
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>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Tue,  9 Sep 2003 18:49:24 -0400 (EDT)
> From: "Elizabeth Ramsey" <email @ redacted>
> Subject: [IP] Re: obesity and Type 2, CDC
>
>  --- On Tue 09/09, Kress Family &lt; email @ redacted &gt; wrote:
>
>  From: Kress Family [mailto: email @ redacted]To:
email @ redacted:
> Tue, 9 Sep 2003 18:13:40 -0500Subject: [IP] Re: obesity and Type 2, CDC
>  If you are referring to me, yes, I do have an agenda. That is to ask
people to
> back what they say with sources/facts; especially when they are attempting
to
> quote something from a website, book, magazine, etc. I don't want their
> interpretation, I want to read their source for myself. Many times info is
taken
> and then gets tweaked or twisted to suit a personal viewpoint/agenda.
>  Some things they don't know, but they do know (and state it quite often
on that
> site as well as any other reputable site) that obesity is a risk factor in
> DEVELOPING Type 2 diabetes. It also states that Type 2 can be delayed or
> prevented by keeping off excess weight and staying active. This is a known
fact.
> I've seen it happen in my own family and with other people I know. So the
weight
> HAD to be the reason these people had Type 2.And they do know that excess
weight
> is a risk factor and that losing weight will improve or do away with Type
2
> diabetes in a lot of people.Absolutely true. It also does no good to
ignore
> important facts. No one should feel guilty or blame themselves for having
> diabetes. The best thing to do is get all the facts and then try to deal
with it
> as best you can. It's a personal choice as to whether you go the lose
weight,
> exercise, diet change route or choose to take insulin and not change your
> lifestyle. And no one has the right to judge anyone's choic!
>  es. But there are different choices that work.Cindy
>
>  Cindy, As you say, it is a RISK factor but what you are implying by what
you
> are writing is that ALL we have to do is lose weight. Well, some of us
just
> can't...it is NOT that simple. Even eating fewer than 1000 calories a day,
it is
> impossible and do NOT tell me it is. I've personally done it and still
failed
> that diet.
>
>  You are writing as if it's an absolute and by doing that trying to lay a
guilt
> trip on those of us who just can NOT succeed at losing weight no matter
how hard
> we try. Well, how would you feel if we turned the tables and came down
your
> throat.
>
>  When I married my husband it was right after his oldest was diagnosed
with type
> I. His youngest had been sick and then his oldest. Three weeks later, she
ended
> up in the hospital in DKA. Pam, the youngest, took it upon herself to
blame
> herself for Kim's diabetes. I didn't know that for about 2 1/2 years but
when I
> found out I had to find a way to absolve her of the blame. I had just read
an
> article in Reader's Digest, fortunately, that gave a layperson's
explanation of
> why someone might develope type I diabetes. I showed the article to Pam
and
> explained that the disease had been in Kim all along. What had happened
was that
> the illness had just triggered the diabetes right then. Pam was satisfied
and
> went on. How right I was, I really didn't care. I had taken the guilt from
a 12
> year old that she had carried for over 2 years.
>
>  I have spent MOST of my life being told that it was ALL my fault that I
was
> FAT. Well, you know something...it isn't. I happen to have a gene that
makes me
> that way and you are NOT going to make me or anyone else feel guilty
because we
> have type II diabetes. One day YOU may be in our shoes and some person may
be in
> YOUR face saying the same thing.
>
>  Studies are just that. There were studies that said butter was bad for
you so
> they told you to eat margarine. Well, guess what...now they tell us that
> margarine is bad. There were studies that said fat was bad for you, now
it's *oh
> we're sorry...but you can have fat but make sure it's the good kind*.
There've
> been studies that said eggs were bad for you, now they aren't. I'm sorry,
I've
> gotten DIZZY with the studies the scientists have done and contradicted
> themselves on. I've decided that I'm gonna eat what *I* feel is good for
me and
> let the scientist make THEMSELVES dizzy!
>
>  Statistics are a slippery *animal* or didn't you know that? You can make
them
> say ANYTHING you want them to if you wiggle them the right way.
>
> As far *getting all the facts*...well, no one has those. Liz
>
> _______________________________________________
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> The most personalized portal on the Web!
> - ----------------------------------------------------------
> for HELP or to subscribe/unsubscribe, contact:
> HELP@insulin-pumpers.org
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Tue, 9 Sep 2003 15:54:22 -0700 (PDT)
> From: Heidi Vogan <email @ redacted>
> Subject: RE: [IP] Dear Abby-In defense of my endocrinologist
>
> In defense of Dr.Barrett's letter,
>
> http://www.siliconvalley.com/mld/mercurynews/living/6395563.htm
>   I don't feel he is implying that people with
>  diabetes
>  never get emotionally upset due to the effects of
>  the
>  disease. "Wants a life in Virginia's" husband was
>  obviosly on a downhill slide,even before he went
>  into
>  complete denial,quitting his medication + diabetes
>  care.Diabetes may have made such behavior worse,but
>  did not cause it.(as Dr.Barrett stated-"does not
>  come
>  about".) Her husband has been abusing his body for
>  his
>  entire life,being diagnosed made him a "more votile
>  person that he was before.."(according to her
>  letter)I
>  know that diabetes can cause depression, and in some
>  circumstances(due to high or low blood sugars) all
>  out
>  aggression,I've experienced that.And no doubt not
>  treating the diabetes did make the guy more nuts..On
>  a final note,Dr.Barrett is my physician + a fine one
>  at that,(he sure as heck does understand the mood
> swings of D,he puts up with MINE!)he understands the
> emotional issues but he also knows the difference
> between the diseise's   effects,and
>  something else.And from this lady's letter,pinning
>  the
>  blame on diabetes is nuts.
>                    Heidi
>
>  --- margo2 <email @ redacted> wrote:
>  > Dr. Barrett needs to read many of the past
> > articles
> > > on mood-swings, caused
> > > by blood glucose swings, in diabetes magazines I
> > > think.
> > >
> > > Margo
> >
> - --- margo2 <email @ redacted> wrote:
> > Dr. Barrett needs to read many of the past articles
> > on mood-swings, caused
> > by blood glucose swings, in diabetes magazines I
> > think.
> >
> > Margo
>
>
> __________________________________
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> Yahoo! SiteBuilder - Free, easy-to-use web site design software
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> - ----------------------------------------------------------
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> HELP@insulin-pumpers.org
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Tue, 9 Sep 2003 19:13:12 EDT
> From: email @ redacted
> Subject: Re: [IP] Re: obesity and Type 2, CDC
>
> In a message dated 9/9/2003 2:21:24 PM Alaskan Daylight Time,
> email @ redacted writes:
> > >>If you spend some time on the CDC Diabetes website, you'll notice
> > quickly that they admit to not knowing the causes of Diabetes (Type 1
> > or Type 2).  Heck they don't even know why some women get gestional
> > diabetes and some don't.  One of the reasons they call it "practicing"
> > medicine, is that most of the time, they just don't know.<<
> >
> > Some things they don't know, but they do know (and state it quite
> > often on that site as well as any other reputable site) that obesity
> > is a risk factor in DEVELOPING Type 2 diabetes.  It also states that
> > Type 2 can be delayed or prevented by keeping off excess weight and
> > staying active.  This is a known fact.  I've seen it happen in my own
> > family and with other people I know.  So the weight HAD to be the
> > reason these people had Type 2.
>
> But the point is, that weight or not, you need to have the gene that
causes
> you to develop Type 2, or Type 1 even.
>
> >Type 2 can be delayed or prevented by keeping off excess weight and
> >staying active.  This is a known fact.
>
> I wonder if this will work with grey hair also?
> Tip: You can color your hair, but the grey is still there, just hidden
under
> a veil.
>
> Tina H.
> - ----------------------------------------------------------
> for HELP or to subscribe/unsubscribe, contact:
> HELP@insulin-pumpers.org
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Tue, 9 Sep 2003 19:14:59 EDT
> From: email @ redacted
> Subject: Re: [IP] Re: obesity and Type 2, CDC
>
> In a message dated 9/9/2003 2:21:24 PM Alaskan Daylight Time,
> email @ redacted writes:
> > Absolutely true.  It also does no good to ignore important facts.  No
> > one should feel guilty or blame themselves for having diabetes.  The
> > best thing to do is get all the facts and then try to deal with it as
> > best you can.  It's a personal choice as to whether you go the lose
> > weight, exercise, diet change route or choose to take insulin and not
> > change your lifestyle.  And no one has the right to judge anyone's
> > choices.  But there are different choices that work.
> >
> > Cindy
>
> I totally agree Cindy! Thanks!
> Tina H.
> - ----------------------------------------------------------
> for HELP or to subscribe/unsubscribe, contact:
> HELP@insulin-pumpers.org
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Tue, 09 Sep 2003 19:32:54 -0400
> From: len lutz <email @ redacted>
> Subject: Re:[IP] Dear Abby
>
> i KNOW i have had a number of DIS... (Diabetic Ignorance Syndrome) s,
> which i sometimes get, around my wife, or a  DAE (Diabetic A..H. Episode),
> which i sometimes have around anyone, when my bs is low.
> Now, whether i am this way, most of the time, is left to conjecture,
> but, i can tell you, that I sure feel different, when im low, and have
done
> and said some things,
> i would not do, nor say, when in a more "sane" state (again, left to
> interpretation)...
>
> high, (BS  that is)......., i know im sort of upset, but, i think i keep
> that to myself....
>
> if they want to put some strange label, on me,  so be it... but, at least
> for me,
> low bs, definitely causes some "Strange Ch Ch Changes"
>
> i must say, im glad to see, that the person chosen to lead ADA, has such
> awareness...
> i personally would like to see someone with personal experience...
> i dont know this guy, but, so far, IMO, he seems clue-less.
> (im sure he highly touted, and has a wall full of fancy awards)
>
> (You may totally disagree)
> - ----------------------------------------------------------
> for HELP or to subscribe/unsubscribe, contact:
> HELP@insulin-pumpers.org
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Tue, 09 Sep 2003 19:39:34 -0400
> From: Linda Kelly <email @ redacted>
> Subject: Re: [IP] Re: obesity and Type 2
>
> > As you say, it is a risk factor (wt)but what you are implying by whatyou
are
> > writing is that all we have to do is lose weight.  Well, some of us just
>  > can't...it is not that simple. Even eating fewer than 1000 calories a
day, it
> is
> > impossible...
>
> I was Dxed, on Amaryl and about 800 cal, 3oz meat, 1/2 C servings  , alot
of
>  exercise, bike riding, walking miles, light weight lifting, never sitting
> still, or
>  for longer than 10 min at time. When sitting still, doing isometric
exercises,
> &
>  filling up on water. I lost 70 lbs, in a little over 3 months. No orals
worked,
>  ran very high ketones, high blood sugars & was starving. I tried, DM got
worse.
> I may have put weight back on with insulin, but I feel alot better.
> I am of Type 2 origin.
> Linda K d,e,ip
> - ----------------------------------------------------------
> for HELP or to subscribe/unsubscribe, contact:
> HELP@insulin-pumpers.org
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Tue, 9 Sep 2003 16:42:33 -0700
> From: Tom Beatson <email @ redacted>
> Subject: Re:[IP] Dear Abby
>
> On Tue, 9 Sep 2003 17:47:37 -0400 George Davis wrote:
>  >>>Don said:
>  >Sorry, I'm a long way from beliving  that we act the way we do,
> because we
>  >are diabetic!!!
> Sorry to disagree with you Don, but, having been type 1 for 40 years,
> my poor
> wife can tell you of many, many times when I was "combatant", refusing
> to take
> sugar when I was in the 20 or 30 range.  I resist with force, and when I
> finally am revived, I don't even remember being combatant.  I wish it
> were not
> so, but it has happened too many times.  I normally am a pretty nice
> guy ;-)
> George Davis<<<
>
> I agree with George. During the 52+ years of T1 before I started on the
> pump I had many (I lost count) occasions of low bg when I resisted the
> attempts of others to get me to eat or drink anything that would
> elevate my bg. Since starting on the pump 8 years ago I'm not aware of
> any occasions of low bg when I became resistant or combative. I believe
> it's because the rate of change (in the downward direction) of bg with
> the pump tends to be much less than it was with injections of NPH.
>
> Tom Beatson
> dx 12/1942, 506 1995, 508 2000
> - ----------------------------------------------------------
> for HELP or to subscribe/unsubscribe, contact:
> HELP@insulin-pumpers.org
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Tue, 9 Sep 2003 16:49:49 -0700 (PDT)
> From: Artorius Rex <email @ redacted>
> Subject: Re:[IP] Dear Abby
>
> I have to agree with George, having been there many times myself in the
> 20-30 range.  I'm normally a very gentle, easy to get along with guy.  If
I
> don't like what you're trying to force feed me, I will resist.
>
> It wasn't until we discovered that I will eat jelly beans (specifically
> Jelly Belly) for just about any reason, that the problem went away.
> Of course, I haven't had any of those refusing the treat a low episodes
>  since the pump too.
>
> The mind operates on a completely different level when low.  Rational
> doesn't come into the picture.
>
> - -Brent
>
> - --- George Davis <email @ redacted> wrote:
> > Don said:
> > Sorry, I'm a long way from beliving  that we act the way we do, because
we
> > are
> > diabetic!!!
> >
> > Sorry to disagree with you Don, but, having been type 1 for 40 years, my
poor
> > wife can tell you of many, many times when I was "combatant", refusing
to
> > take
> > sugar when I was in the 20 or 30 range.  I resist with force, and when I
> > finally am revived, I don't even remember being combatant.  I wish it
were
> > not
> > so, but it has happened too many times.  I normally am a pretty nice guy
;-)
> >
> > George Davis
> > ----------------------------------------------------------
> > for HELP or to subscribe/unsubscribe, contact:
> > HELP@insulin-pumpers.org
> - ----------------------------------------------------------
> for HELP or to subscribe/unsubscribe, contact:
> HELP@insulin-pumpers.org
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Tue, 9 Sep 2003 20:13:38 -0400
> From: "Vixen" <email @ redacted>
> Subject: [IP] Looking at Choices - 508 vs. 512
>
> Hey There!
>
> I haven't been on here in ages (hectic life, got away from the "online
time
> available), I've just lurked off & on over the past few years.  I have a
> pressing question now, & I'd welcome feedback/observations/other people's
> experience here.  I am a Disetronic H-tron plus user (four years, August
> 23rd), & when I got "the letter" from Disetronic, I asked my endo about it
&
> was advised to look at switching over to MiniMed.  Part of the dilemma is
the
> fact that I like my pump, have had no problems, & have been very happy.
If it
> seems wise to switch, however - I trust my doctor & he's never steered me
> wrong (whether I was in "good patient" or "bad patient" mode, he's been
very
> good for me), so I am looking into doing so.  Contacted MiniMed - they got
the
> insurance approval, & the rep I've been speaking with was literally ready
to
> ship today...without actually discussing with me what I WANT in a pump,
what
> model (or sets, or supplies) I might need or prefer - no input from my
end.  I
> said "Okay, let's slow down a little" - I had thought he would be sending
> literature out that would allow me to compare the 508 with the Paradigm &
then
> I could ask questions to be able to make an informed choice.  Well, the
> MiniMed information packet is now on its way, so I should be seeing that
in a
> few days.  What I am looking for is - what caused anyone out there to
choose
> one over the other, whether anyone regrets the choice they did make or if
they
> are satisfied...the benefits & drawbacks, from a pumper's perspective.  I
do
> know I am not crazy about the idea of having to change cartridges
> (reservoirs?) twice as often...I like having the whole week's supply of
> insulin on board.  From what I was told by one girl I spoke with there,
the
> "new Paradigm" that will be coming will have the larger reservoir, so she
> tossed around the idea of waiting for that, if this isn't an immediate
need.
>
> Any thoughts?  Your take is very welcome, in this.
>
>
> Many Thanks,
> Sammi
> Pumper & exhausted teacher (yes, it WILL get easier as the little urchins
> learn their way around the great big world of elementary school!)
> - ----------------------------------------------------------
> for HELP or to subscribe/unsubscribe, contact:
> HELP@insulin-pumpers.org
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 10 Sep 2003 00:33:42 +0000
> From: email @ redacted
> Subject: [IP] Article on Web MD
>
> FYI
>
> There's a very good, though quite clinical, article on the Development and
Use
> of the Pump on Medscape at Web MD.
>
> Continuous Subcutaneous Insulin Infusion: Intensive Treatment, Flexible
> Lifestyle CME
> Author: Scott Lee, MD
> Medical Writer: Emma Hitt, PhD
> - ----------------------------------------------------------
> for HELP or to subscribe/unsubscribe, contact:
> HELP@insulin-pumpers.org
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Tue, 9 Sep 2003 18:13:02 -0700
> From: "maverickmom (Kerri)" <email @ redacted>
> Subject: [IP] just a test - ignore
>
> Just testing to see if this goes through. I've sent a message to
> the list today, twice, that didn't appear.
>
> Take care, Kerri, mom to Shannon - 13 (dx 11/96, pmpg HTron+
> 11/99 & Cozmo 8/03)...and her 7 siblings  :)
> "...what it all boils down to  - do the right thing, everything
> goes fine; do the wrong thing, everything's a mess." - Robert
> Spott, Yurok tribe, 1890
> - ----------------------------------------------------------
> for HELP or to subscribe/unsubscribe, contact:
> HELP@insulin-pumpers.org
>
> ------------------------------
>
> End of insulin-pumpers-digest V7 #523
> *************************************
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