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Re: [IP] Re: blood donation-Barbara B. and Sue K.



At any rate, I guess I'm more convinced now that a type 1's blood would not hurt
the recipient because of all
the processing it goes through, and all the people who have donated successfully.
I can't remember where I
saw that it was a felony, but it seemed at the time that it was a very reputable
and reliable publication and I was
very shocked. What if I had somehow slipped through the cracks and donated
without knowing this.
(Like someone already pointed out, the laws are different in every state, just
like animal cruelty - in some states it's a
misdemeanor, and in others it's a felony.)

My main point in continuing this topic was that I just wanted to make sure that
the
second topic of insulin going directly into the blood was cleared up -

If someone were to give  a person a large amount of insulin into the vein
(directly into the blood) it would *indeed* overdose the person and be harmful.
In other words it's very dangerous to say  "Oh it wouldn't  hurt the person at
all..."
Anyway, I'm sure everyone here is so familiar with insulin and its affects, that
we probably
don't need to discuss it anymore.

I honor anyone who has donated blood during this week to help the
whole situation.



Sam wrote:

> At 08:16 AM 9/13/2001 Sue Kinzelman wrote:
>  >Yes, it eventually split into two subjects:
>  >            One was that giving someone an overdose of insulin could hurt
>  >them.
>  >            And two: would insulin in a donor's blood hurt the recipient,
>  >and therefore preclude a type 1 from giving blood.
>  >
>  >Barbara said that insulin in a donor's blood would not hurt a recipient
>  >because it would be dealt with right away, (which I disagreed with). If
>  >it's a small amount then probably... Then someone else pointed out that the
>  >blood would be purified before being given to a recipient, so the insulin
>  >remaining might be very small. .
>  >
>  >I know people who take hundreds of units a day. Can the blood cleaning
>  >process remove all insulin?
>
> Every person has insulin in their bloodstream. You can't live very long
> without it. When you bolus or inject, the insulin goes subcutaneously, not
> directly into the bloodstream. As such, it may take hours to fully get into
> your system and even then, it will react with the glucose in your
> bloodstream (that's the way it works). If you have more glucose than
> insulin your BG levels are high. If you have more insulin than glucose then
> your BG levels are low. Therefore, if your blood glucose levels are normal
> then the levels of insulin in your bloodstream should also be relatively
> normal too.
>
> Sam
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