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RE: [IP] Type 2 versus type 1



I had a similar experience. I went for a routine company physical. On the
way back to the office I looked over the encounter slip I had received from
the doctor. He had circled "diabetes" but had said not one word to me about
it. I was in shock. I called his office and asked what I was supposed to do.
"Try to lose a little weight and watch what you eat" was the advice I got.
No HBA1C, no foot exam, no prescribed diet, NOTHING. I bought a glucometer.
That Christmas at the office party I ate 4 small cookies. An hour later my
sugar was 400. Called the doctor. Received the same advice yet again. I
changed doctors. It's amazing how cavalierly some docs treat type 2 (or
should I say DON'T treat) diabetes. It may not kill you in a couple of days
if you don't treat it, but it will kill you just the same.

David Dougherty



-----Original Message-----
From: email @ redacted [mailto:email @ redacted]On Behalf
Of Sam Skopp
Sent: Thursday, September 30, 1999 12:21 AM
To: email @ redacted
Subject: Re: [IP] Type 2 versus type 1


At 08:15 PM 9/29/1999  email @ redacted wrote:
 >On a personal note, I had to tell my doctor I thought I had diabetes. He
 >laughed at me (I was only in my 30s), but ordered the tests to humor me.
My
 >fasting level was 311. "Yep, you have diabetes," he said. "Here. Follow
this.
 >Don't eat any sugar."

Reminds me of when I was first diagnosed, at age 37. The doctor took me
aside in a hallway and said "looks like you have diabetes". He then just
casually asked me to talk to a nurse about taking injections and start on
insulin. He prescribed a huge dose of L (at least it was a lot more than I
would need for a few years) and that was the end of that. I walked out in
shock and without any information about diet or even anything about
hypoglycemia. This was at a major Kaiser Permanente medical facility in
West Los Angeles.

A few days later, after talking to my sister who is also a type 1 diabetic,
I switched doctors (and eventually medical plans) and he checked me into
the hospital for a week. Both my wife and I got all sorts of education and
we started slow with the insulin until we could figure out what dose I
really needed.

 >On diet control, you can't deviate without causing high BGs. I lasted on
diet
 >for awhile, but my BGs started climbing. I suppose. After all, like a
type 1,
 >I wasn't told to test. I was eventually put on oral meds. They didn't
work.
 >Still, my doctor (another one by this time) kept trying pill combination
 >after pill combination on me.

I hadn't thought about this... I know one person at work who is type 2 and
on pills. He apparently found a combination that works well fairly
readily... but obviously he may not be typical.

 >Frankly, I'd much rather take insulin (pumping it, of course!) and have a
 >life than having to control DM on diet or oral meds and feeling absolutely
 >miserable.

You are absolutely right. Everyone should have the available tools to make
them feel as "normal" as possible. Obviously you weren't getting what you
needed. I would blame the medical care you were receiving... they obviously
either didn't have a clue about how you were feeling, or didn't really care.

 >That's type 2, Sam. You're not taken seriously, you're not given the
proper
 >care and you're not educated. In fact, the first time I was referred to an
 >educator was when I started taking insulin.

I find that totally mind-boggling... with all the education that's out
there now, it's hard to believe the ignorance! You would think that at
least the medical establishment would know better... (sigh)

Sam

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