[Previous Months][Date Index][Thread Index][Join - Register][Login]
[Message Prev][Message Next][Thread Prev][Thread Next]

[IP] Re: surgery and the pump



** Reply to message from insulin-pumpers-digest:

> Date: Tue, 22 Sep 1998 11:58:05 EDT
> From: email @ redacted
> Subject: [IP] Surgery and Pump
> 
> I am having surgery next week and I would like to ask how surgery affected
> your diabetes on the pump.  My endo wants me to reduce my basal rate for the
> a.m. to 0.5.  I am rethinking his advice.  My BGs are perfect in the a.m. on
> my present basals that vary from 0.6-0.8. during the morning hours.  I am
> considering leaving my basal rate the same.  I am thinking that with the
> excitement ( this is probably a poor choice of words) of surgery, my BG will
> go up.  I know it goes up alot when I participate in a 5K or 10K race.  Any of
> you who have had surgery with the pump, what was your experience?  Did your BG
> go up or down?  Did you reduce your pump basal rate?  ellen

I had emergency surgery last January resulting from a very nasty
Charcot-complicated compound fracture of my ankle --- actually two surgeries in
three days --- in a hospital in northern Wisconsin.  The anaesthesiologist
handled the insulin dosage details:  he didn't have much experience with it, but
he had a lot of intellectual curiosity and was a quick learner.  For the first
surgery he had me remove the pump completely --- he and the surgeon didn't want
to have to deal with a hypoglycemic reaction during surgery, and felt a
temporary elevated bg was preferable.  For the second surgery, he had me set the
pump at 50% the previous evening (this is a Disetronic where temporary rates are
set as percentages) based on the previous experience, and then as they were
rolling me into the OR he said "OK, set it at 100% now."

What was more interesting was the adjustments I made following surgery: for a
week or two I was running it at 120-140% of the usual basals, and then that
crept down to 110-120%, and finally after a few weeks to plain old 100%.

I think you find that the medical team quite reasonably wants to err on the
side of high blood sugars rather than possible hypoglycemic reactions.


-----------------------------------------------------------------
Richard G. Larson,  Professor,       Dept of Math., Stat., and Comp. Sci.
U. of Ill. at Chicago,  851 S. Morgan St, M/C 249,  Chicago IL 60607-7045
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
(312) 996-8616   email: email @ redacted    homepage: http://www.uic.edu/~rgl/
PGP key fingerprint:     FA 6A 8D 21 41 0D 33 E9  E4 5F 46 83 50 C1 34 09
----------------------------------------------------------
Insulin-Pumpers website http://www.bizsystems.com/Diabetes/