[Previous Months][Date Index][Thread Index][Join - Register][Login]
  [Message Prev][Message Next][Thread Prev][Thread Next]

Re: [IP] Is this a *Breakthrough*????



Yeah, after all this time the medical profession in Brittian is 
finally discovering MDI and carb counting. Some day maybe they will 
discover Pump Therapy :-(  The daily struggle our friends across the 
water must go through with their government run health care system is 
appalling.

Michael

> This was a report on the BBC  10/4/02. I don't know about anyway else
> but the one I received it from has been using this type of regime in
> New York since about 10 years ago.
> 
> http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/health/2295325.stm
> 
> Friday, 4 October, 2002, 00:35 GMT 01:35 UK
> *Diabetics 'freed from strict diets'*
> Insulin injection
> Some 350,000 Britons have type I diabetes
> A new treatment regime for patients with type I diabetes looks set
> to transform the lives of millions of people with the disease.
> 
> A study by doctors in England has found that simple adjustments to
> the amount of insulin patients take allows them to eat almost
> anything they wish.
> 
> The vast majority of people with the disease currently have to
> follow strict diets to ensure their sugar levels remain stable.
> 
> 
> This is a fantastic breakthrough and offers people with diabetes the
> chance of a more spontaneous, normal life
> 
> Suzanne Lucas, Diabetes UK
> 
> Doctors said the breakthrough would enable patients "to fit diabetes
> into their lives rather than their lives into diabetes".
> 
> Dr Simon Heller and colleagues at Northern General Hospital in
> Sheffield enrolled 169 patients with type I diabetes into their
> insulin dose adjustment for normal eating (DAFNE) trial.
> 
> *Slow uptake*
> 
> The theory that patients with type I diabetes can eat anything they
> wish as long as they adjust their insulin intake was first developed
> in Germany.
> 
> However, it has been slow to take off in other parts of the world,
> including the UK. The National Institute for Clinical Excellence is
> currently assessing the programme.
> 
> The Sheffield doctors divided the patients into two groups.
> 
> The first received training on how to adjust their insulin intake to
> take account of their changing diet. The second group received their
> usual treatment.
> 
> After six months, the doctors found that those in the first group
> had more stable blood sugar levels despite the fact that they had to
> take insulin injections more often.
> 
> They also reported greater satisfaction with treatment, general
> wellbeing and quality of life.
> 
> Writing in the British Medical Journal, the doctors said the
> findings had the potential to dramatically improve the lives of
> people with type I diabetes.
> 
> "We have shown in a group of volunteers that skills training in
> insulin adjustment that provides patients with the ability to fit
> diabetes into their lives rather than their lives into diabetes
> improves quality of life and glycaemic control in the short term.
> 
> "The DAFNE approach has the potential to reduce the incidence of
> microvascular complications and thereby protect quality of life in
> the long term as well as the short term."
> 
> They said further research is needed to see if the findings could
> apply to all patients with type I diabetes. But they estimate that
> at least half could benefit from this approach.
> 
> They added that the programme could help the NHS to save money by
> reducing the cost of treating patients who develop kidney disease
> and eye problems.
> 
> *'Fantastic breakthrough'*
> 
> The charity Diabetes UK described the findings as "fantastic".
> 
> Suzanne Lucas, its director of care, said: "DAFNE has been a
> liberating experience for people on the trial. Many people found
> their whole lifestyle and outlook on life has improved following the
> course and with better diabetes control their worries about
> complications have reduced.
> 
> "Participants also found they were able to travel abroad without
> worrying about missing a meal or eating on time.
> 
> "This is a fantastic breakthrough and offers people with diabetes
> the chance of a more spontaneous, normal life."
> 
> Type 1 diabetes develops if the body is unable to produce any
> insulin. This type of diabetes usually appears before the age of 40.
> 
> An estimated 350,000 people in the UK have type I diabetes. That
> figure is expected to increase substantially in the years ahead
> because of poor diet and people exercising less.
> ---------------------------------------------------------- for HELP
> or to subscribe/unsubscribe, contact: HELP@insulin-pumpers.org send
> a DONATION http://www.Insulin-Pumpers.org/donate.shtml
----------------------------------------------------------
for HELP or to subscribe/unsubscribe, contact: HELP@insulin-pumpers.org
send a DONATION http://www.Insulin-Pumpers.org/donate.shtml