[Previous Months][Date Index][Thread Index][Join - Register][Login]
[Message Prev][Message Next][Thread Prev][Thread Next]

Re: [IP] Highs after eating



- --------------978567E10699595FE4E3C583
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Barb,
Gastroparesis is a bit tricky b/c it is not a constant factor.  It took me years
to understand this and I've only just found someone (dr.) who gets it too.  Let
me try to explain a few things it might help to know.  No one item on this list
does it alone.  For me, I have to combine them (sometimes one or two aren't
relevant) for a clear picture:

   * Gastroparesis is slowed motility in your digestive system b/c of impaired
     neurological function.   That means the symptoms are reactive and may show
     up in varying ways and degrees at any time (although mine do tend to go in
     trends).
   * If you eat fat or protein it slows down the rate at which your body
     processes food.  Eventually it will even slow down the rate at which you
     absorb juice (I know doesn't seem possible but it is true!)  Fat and/or
     protein at a meal will slow the meal down.  However, there is also a long
     term fat and protein effect.  Therefore, if I eat mostly carbs for a week
     and then go out for pizza or mexican or other high protein/fat meals, the
     meal will be a lot faster than on a week I've been eating protein and fat
     consistently.
   * If your stomach is relatively empty and you eat mostly carb meals then you
     may or may not see any delay at all.  You have to factor in not only the
     present meal but whether the food you've eaten for the last few meals seems
     to be gone.
   * Steady exercise and activity will speed up your digestion.  Initially it
     will be variable.  If you keep a consistent schedule, after a few weeks,
     everything will speed up.  I've mostly found that it continues to speed up
     over 6-8 months with ocassional plateaus.
   * Tighter blood sugar control reverses the neurological damage.  Evidence is
     mixed as to whether it can be entirely "cured" but at any rate the symptoms
     can be substantially reversed.  That means that over time, as your bgs
     improve, your digestion time will speed up.  The opposite is also true.
     High bgs will provoke more gastroparesis.  If I eat a high fat/protein meal
     after even one 300 range high it is already slower!  I've read a few pieces
     of research that document similar findings.  Research in this area, though,
     over all is pretty scarce.
   * Improved symptoms (not only from bgs) cause further improvement.  Bad
     symptoms cause more gastroparesis.

How does all this apply to your story?  Well, any of these could be relevant.
It would most likely depend on how good your control is and what your meal
consisted of.  When I went and read research in the medical library one
interesting piece of info did surface which is that some researchers were
suspecting that large numbers of long term type 1 diabetics have undiagnosed
gastroparesis but that the symptoms are fairly mild. One study even made it
sound like retinopathy -- I've been told and shown pictures that retinal changes
are apparant in the eyes of someone with diabetes very very early and after any
kind of highs or lows.  It's just that most people don't acquire "retinopathy",
treatable, long term vision impairment for years and even decades after that.

Hope that helps a little,

Ruth

Barb Schiller wrote:

> Thanks to all for your replies - but I think I was misunderstood.  I will
> try to explain it better.
>
> I Was told that I have gastropareis - but my blood sugars 1 1/2 hours after
> I have eaten are sometimes as high as 250 (which is telling me that I am
> absorbing my food quickly) by the 3rd or 4th hour I will be back down in the
> low 100s.
>
> I have read a lot on this list re: check your bs 2 hours after you eat and
> if it is high you know that you did not bolus enough for your meal.  So I am
> then inclined to bolus some more - but if I do I end up too low by the end
> of the 4th hour.
>
> Does this sound like gastropareis?  I may have it but maybe it is better
> with the pump.
>
> My problem is still there - I don't like seeing any numbers higher than 180
> anymore (funny to think that pre-pump 300 was acceptable LOL)
>
> I guess I just wonder if I need to bolus more premeal (or 30 minutes
> premeal) to cover the high I seem to get even though it is short lived.
>
> Or - should I just not check for 3 hours - then I would never know that it
> went that high because my bs would start to be lower.
>
> BarbS
>
> 
> Insulin-Pumpers website http://www.bizsystems.com/Diabetes/



- --------------978567E10699595FE4E3C583
Content-Type: text/html; charset=us-ascii
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

<HTML>
Barb,
<BR>Gastroparesis is a bit tricky b/c it is not a constant factor.&nbsp;
It took me years to understand this and I've only just found someone (dr.)
who gets it too.&nbsp; Let me try to explain a few things it might help
to know.&nbsp; No one item on this list does it alone.&nbsp; For me, I
have to combine them (sometimes one or two aren't relevant) for a clear
picture:
<UL>
<LI>
Gastroparesis is slowed motility in your digestive system b/c of impaired
neurological function.&nbsp;&nbsp; That means the symptoms are reactive
and may show up in varying ways and degrees at any time (although mine
do tend to go in trends).</LI>

<LI>
If you eat fat or protein it slows down the rate at which your body processes
food.&nbsp; Eventually it will even slow down the rate at which you absorb
juice (I know doesn't seem possible but it is true!)&nbsp; Fat and/or protein
at a meal will slow the meal down.&nbsp; However, there is also a long
term fat and protein effect.&nbsp; Therefore, if I eat mostly carbs for
a week and then go out for pizza or mexican or other high protein/fat meals,
the meal will be a lot faster than on a week I've been eating protein and
fat consistently.</LI>

<LI>
If your stomach is relatively empty and you eat mostly carb meals then
you may or may not see any delay at all.&nbsp; You have to factor in not
only the present meal but whether the food you've eaten for the last few
meals seems to be gone.</LI>

<LI>
Steady exercise and activity will speed up your digestion.&nbsp; Initially
it will be variable.&nbsp; If you keep a consistent schedule, after a few
weeks, everything will speed up.&nbsp; I've mostly found that it continues
to speed up over 6-8 months with ocassional plateaus.</LI>

<LI>
Tighter blood sugar control reverses the neurological damage.&nbsp; Evidence
is mixed as to whether it can be entirely "cured" but at any rate the symptoms
can be substantially reversed.&nbsp; That means that over time, as your
bgs improve, your digestion time will speed up.&nbsp; The opposite is also
true.&nbsp; High bgs will provoke more gastroparesis.&nbsp; If I eat a
high fat/protein meal after even one 300 range high it is already slower!&nbsp;
I've read a few pieces of research that document similar findings.&nbsp;
Research in this area, though, over all is pretty scarce.</LI>

<LI>
Improved symptoms (not only from bgs) cause further improvement.&nbsp;
Bad symptoms cause more gastroparesis.</LI>
</UL>
How does all this apply to your story?&nbsp; Well, any of these could be
relevant.&nbsp; It would most likely depend on how good your control is
and what your meal consisted of.&nbsp; When I went and read research in
the medical library one interesting piece of info did surface which is
that some researchers were suspecting that large numbers of long term type
1 diabetics have undiagnosed gastroparesis but that the symptoms are fairly
mild. One study even made it sound like retinopathy -- I've been told and
shown pictures that retinal changes are apparant in the eyes of someone
with diabetes very very early and after any kind of highs or lows.&nbsp;
It's just that most people don't acquire "retinopathy", treatable, long
term vision impairment for years and even decades after that.

<P>Hope that helps a little,

<P>Ruth

<P>Barb Schiller wrote:
<BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=CITE>Thanks to all for your replies - but I think I was
misunderstood.&nbsp; I will
<BR>try to explain it better.

<P>I Was told that I have gastropareis - but my blood sugars 1 1/2 hours
after
<BR>I have eaten are sometimes as high as 250 (which is telling me that
I am
<BR>absorbing my food quickly) by the 3rd or 4th hour I will be back down
in the
<BR>low 100s.

<P>I have read a lot on this list re: check your bs 2 hours after you eat
and
<BR>if it is high you know that you did not bolus enough for your meal.&nbsp;
So I am
<BR>then inclined to bolus some more - but if I do I end up too low by
the end
<BR>of the 4th hour.

<P>Does this sound like gastropareis?&nbsp; I may have it but maybe it
is better
<BR>with the pump.

<P>My problem is still there - I don't like seeing any numbers higher than
180
<BR>anymore (funny to think that pre-pump 300 was acceptable LOL)

<P>I guess I just wonder if I need to bolus more premeal (or 30 minutes
<BR>premeal) to cover the high I seem to get even though it is short lived.

<P>Or - should I just not check for 3 hours - then I would never know that
it
<BR>went that high because my bs would start to be lower.

<P>BarbS

<P>
<BR>Insulin-Pumpers website <A
HREF="http://www.bizsystems.com/Diabetes/">http://www.bizsystems.com/Diabetes/</A></BLO
CKQUOTE>
&nbsp;</HTML>

- --------------978567E10699595FE4E3C583--


Insulin-Pumpers website http://www.bizsystems.com/Diabetes/