[Previous Months][Date Index][Thread Index][Join - Register][Login]
[Message Prev][Message Next][Thread Prev][Thread Next]

Re: [IP] MiniMed vs. Disetronic



Cindy,

I interviewed users of both MM and D pumps, met with them and saw their pumps
and supplies and discussed how they managed day-to-day with their pumps and
in the end I chose the Disetronic pump.  I began pumping two years ago last
week.  One of the things I like best about the D pump is that I received two
of them, each warranteed for two years of use.  At the end of 24 months of
use (the pump keeps track of that itself) it gives you a notice to send the
pump back for a service check.  Having the second pump came in handy. About 6
months into pumping  the pump quit working on a Friday evening.  I just
programmed my second pump and reconnected.  The next day I called D and was
told to mail in the non-working pump which was replaced.  I had dropped the
pump too many times on the tile floor of the bathroom and had cracked the
case which had let some moisture into the electronics.  There was no charge
for the replacement pump.  Another thing I like about the D pump is the glass
insulin cartridge.  I fill three of these from one bottle of H insulin.
 Since the cartridge holds 315 units of insulin and I use about 25 units a
day I can last a long time before having to insert a new insulin cartridge.
  I have never had the insulin go bad.  I use Comfort (Tender) sets
execlusively and change them every 3 days.  I have the H-Tron V100 and like
the raised blue buttons, the fact that I can program the pump to beep or to
remain silent when I am bolusing, (I like the audible beep so I do not have
to look at the pump when I am taking a bolus.)  And I chose the clear pumps,
so at a glance I can see how much insulin is remaining  (even though I can
also retrieve that information by pushing one of the blue buttons.  

I have found the insulin remaining beeps to be accurate and often run my
cartridge down to the last 5 units before changing it.  I have never had an
empty cartridge alarm or occulusion alarm.  

Mary Tobin