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RE:[IP] Dental problem, numbing tooth



Yet another case of YMMV (Your mileage may vary)...

Every time I've had fillings, root canal's, etc., the dentist office doing
the work has commented on how LITTLE numbing pre-treatment I've needed...

My last dental work was over 10 years ago...  The year BEFORE I moved to AL.
I got a root canal on TWO teeth in the SAME DAY...  (BOTH sides of the face
numbed at same time.)

And shortly after the dentist started drilling, he was already commenting on
how surprised he was at how relaxed, and un-responsive I was...  I actually
got an almost THREE HOUR NAP while he was drilling into my teeth!!!  And
when done, he told me that since I had said I thought my pain tolerance was
fairly high, and previous family member's had needed less numbing, on me, he
had instructed the anesthesiologist to give me "only 25% of what calculation
indicated" as the amount of Lidocaiine to use during the treatment.

The dentist/oral surgeon and anesthesiologist were BOTH amazed at the way I
was able to SLEEP during the procedure since they had only used about 1/3
the Lidocaine that their computer calculations had told them I'd need to not
totally NUMB the area, but to only "minimize" or "reduce" the discomfort
level during the procedure.

I currently need some dental work... But since my employer just got dental
coverage LAST YEAR, with a term that they will only cover treatment I need
if I have been covered for at least TWO YEARS since getting the coverage...
I'm FORCED to tolerate the occasional discomfort for another 6 month's
before my insurance will cover ANY of the dental work I need NOW!!!

Wouldn't it seem more logical, and cost effective for the insurer to cover
needed work IMMEDIATELY rather than saying "You need to have our coverage
for xxx-years BEFORE we will even consider covering such a treatment."???

If current insurance covered problem, they could probably get it resolved
for around $160.

Following insurance stipulations, I'm guessing by the time they agree to
cover it, just the Insurance covered portion will likely wind up in excess
of $500!!!

WAKE UP, INSURANCE PROVIDERS!!!   YOU CAN SAVE $$$ BY COVERING TREATMENT
IMMEDIATELY INSTEAD OF REQUIRING THE INSURED TO HAVE HAD THE POLICY FOR XXX
YEARS BEFORE YOU WILL COVER THE NEEDED TREATMENT!!!

Mark Schweim

-----Original Message-----
Date: Fri, 23 May 2008 13:38:54 -0400
From: Ricardo <email @ redacted>
Subject: [IP] Dental problem, numbing tooth

marie wrote:
Has anyone had a problem with the dentist not being able to numb a
tooth?  The whole side of my face got numb but the tooth was still
sensitive.  I was given at least 5 shots.  No numb tooth!

Ricardo Responds:
Another possibility is a condition such as sinusitis which can create
a neuralgia that is mistaken for tooth pain. The dentist can shoot a
lot of local pain killers into the tooth, but since the pain is
radiating from elsewhere, the tooth appears not to numb.
.
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