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[IP] Pump prescription...



John,
Sad to say congrat's on getting on a pump.  Better for all of us if we
made insulin "the natural way."
What part of Dayton do you live it?  I live in Middletown.  This
evening, there was the first Pump Support meeting.  It was held south,
near the Dayton Mall.  That group likely would be one you might want to
consider; there are several real veterans as well as several who are
quite new.

1.  What sort of paraphrenalia is involved in *using* a
pump?  ( I've heard all sorts of "stuff" mentioned, without
really understanding it.  8-( )

Depends over what scope.  Basics include:
Infusion sets (generally teflon tube which sticks 24 hrs/day into your
abdomen.  
Tubing which connects the infusion set to the insulin cartridge.
Cartridge which carries aproximately 300 units of insulin.  These are
filled from the bottle similarly as filling a syringe.
Others include: batteries, site prep wipes, dressings (products used to
help hold the infusion set onto the skin.
When travelling, I include all of the above, plus my backup pump, as
well as supplies to administer shots should both pumps go bad.  Also
spares for my blood meter.

2.  What sort of "training" do you receive: (a) from the
pump vendor? (b) from your local hospital?
Training comes in two general catagories:
1)  How to work the pump.  This includes how to set and change the basal
(background) rate, how to administer a bolus (one-time delivery to cover
a meal or to correct for a high blood sugar.  Also such things as pump
set-up and basic diagnostics (what if you get an occlusion alarm [fancy
term for a clog]).
2)  How to count carbohydrates so that you can determine how much
insulin you need.  In this general catagory is how to recognize a
pattern in you sugars which might indicate that a basal or bolus
(carb/insulin) ratio change is in order.
The first will generally come from the pump supplier.  The second more
from a diabetic educator at a hospital.  In my case both parties were
present when I was set up on the pump.


3.  What are some of the issues invovled in using a pump?
There are numerous issues involved.  IMHO, the biggest is the
responsibility to closely control your diabetes.  The pump is a GREAT
tool toward that end, but it is not a panacea.  Successful pumping
requires continual dilligence on the part of the pumper to stick with
it, and work to stay on top of this disease.

I am in Dayton regularly; if I can be of any help, email me and we can
set something up.

Regards,
Jay
<<<
Date: Mon, 18 May 1998 19:34:33 -0400
From: John Huff <email @ redacted>
Subject: [IP] Pump prescription...

...is what my internist is working on for me.  Supposedly,
last Friday, my insurance co called him to tell what they
needed to pay for my pump.

As a soon-to-be pump user, I need *lots* of info.  For
example:

1.  What sort of paraphrenalia is involved in *using* a
pump?  ( I've heard all sorts of "stuff" mentioned, without
really understanding it.  8-( )

2.  What sort of "training" do you receive: (a) from the
pump vendor? (b) from your local hospital?

3.  What are some of the issues invovled in using a pump?

Thanks all.

John Huff, Dayton OH
( type 1, dx @ 18 months, now 61 )>>>
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