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RE: [IP] Recommended Disconnecting Pump for takeoff and landing



The issue is completely related to air expansion
If you don't have air in the cartridge it cant expand 
Yes some small bubbles could come out of suspension at altitude but the
quantity would be low 

And keep in mind that on ascent if it delivered more insulin that insulin
would still need 2 hours for peak impact, so how you feel at the baggage
claim is totally connected to the length of flight 

Also if there was air in the system and it expanded and pushed out some
insulin on ascent - on decent it would contract and tend to deliver less...


If the issue was as serious as has been described here the pods pumps would
have never been approved 

-----Original Message-----
From: email @ redacted
[mailto:email @ redacted] On Behalf Of Veronica Elsea
Sent: Wednesday, March 19, 2014 12:33 PM
To: email @ redacted
Subject: RE: [IP] Recommended Disconnecting Pump for takeoff and landing

My flight on Sunday is an hour long. Because I travel with a guide dog, I
usually get a lousy choice of seats. Given where my set is, I'm trying to
picture the process of removing the pump, storing it, priming and putting it
back on. I've not had a problem in 23 years, so I may just trust my luck
again. Hmmm.
Veronica

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Phone: 831-429-6407



-----Original Message-----
From: email @ redacted
[mailto:email @ redacted] On Behalf Of Mark Estes
Sent: Tuesday, March 18, 2014 10:59 PM
To: email @ redacted
Subject: Re: [IP] Recommended Disconnecting Pump for takeoff and landing

only if you can climb 8000 feet in about 5 minutes.  Otherwise the effect
takes so long, you can ignore it.  



>________________________________
> From: Richard <email @ redacted>
>To: "email @ redacted" <email @ redacted>
>Sent: Thursday, March 13, 2014 10:24 AM
>Subject: Re: [IP] Recommended Disconnecting Pump for takeoff and 
>landing
>
>
>Does this also apply to mountain climbers?
>
>Richard
>
>Sent from my iPad
>
>> On Mar 13, 2014, at 8:15 AM, Denise Danielson
<email @ redacted>
>wrote:
>>
>> I spoke to a rep from Asante and they told me all insulin pumps 
>> should be disconnected before take off and landing.  I've never known 
>> about before
and
>> wondered if everyone does this?   Here is what is in our user manual
>> concerning traveling by air: Air Travel  When traveling by airplane, 
>> disconnect the infusion set from yourbody during takeoff and landing. 
>> As
with
>> any insulin pump, during takeoff thepressure change in the cabin will
cause
>> any air bubbles in the cartridge andinfusion set to expand. If you 
>> fail
to
>> disconnect, the expanding bubbles will pushinsulin into your body and
lead
to
>> potential overdelivery. By disconnecting theinfusion set before 
>> takeoff
and
>> keeping it disconnected until after the plane reachescruising 
>> altitude,
you
>> can avoid any inadvertent delivery caused by the change inair pressure.
>During
>> landing, air bubbles will contract back to their original size asair
pressure
>> returns to normal. By disconnecting the infusion set and priming
untildrops
>> appear, you can account for the bubble shrinkage and avoid potential 
>> missedinsulin delivery.Before reattaching the infusion set to your 
>> body, perform a tubing prime of at least2 units and observe drops 
>> exiting the infusion set. The change in altitude mayincrease the 
>> likelihood of bubble formation. Therefore, it is important to check 
>> forbubbles frequently
during
>> and after air travel. Be sure to check your BG frequentlyduring air
travel,
>> particularly after takeoff and landing.  Once again thank you for 
>> your interest in Snap and please let us know if we can be of further
assistance.
>>
>> Denise D.
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>> From: email @ redacted
>>> To: email @ redacted
>>> Subject: RE: [IP] Re: Disconnecting Pump for takeoff and landing
>>> Date: Thu, 13 Mar 2014 14:58:32 +0000
>>>
>>> I only had an issue once, and that was when I took 11 flights over 2
days
>>> (requalifying for elite status - lol). I was consistently high those
days,
>> but I
>>> attributed it to the alcohol I was drinking on the plane.
>>>
>>> This is certainly an interesting article, and something someone who 
>>> has
a
>> high
>>> insulin sensitivity factor should keep in mind.
>>> ________________________________________
>>> From: email @ redacted
>> <email @ redacted>
>>> on behalf of Susan Marshall <email @ redacted>
>>> Sent: Tuesday, March 11, 2014 4:15 PM
>>> To: email @ redacted
>>> Subject: [IP] Re: Disconnecting Pump for takeoff and landing
>>>
>>> Denise, I never disconnect before the flight or during landing and
takeoff.
>>> Never had any problems! I fly often.
>>>
>>>
>>> Susan
>>> T1 for 60 years, with no complications!
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>> .
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>.
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