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[IP] Recommended Disconnecting Pump for takeoff and landing



I spoke to a rep from Asante and they told me all insulin pumps should be
disconnected before take off and landing.  I've never known about before and
wondered if everyone does this?   Here is what is in our user manual
concerning traveling by air: Air Travel  When traveling by airplane,
disconnect the infusion set from yourbody during takeoff and landing. As with
any insulin pump, during takeoff thepressure change in the cabin will cause
any air bubbles in the cartridge andinfusion set to expand. If you fail to
disconnect, the expanding bubbles will pushinsulin into your body and lead to
potential overdelivery. By disconnecting theinfusion set before takeoff and
keeping it disconnected until after the plane reachescruising altitude, you
can avoid any inadvertent delivery caused by the change inair pressure. During
landing, air bubbles will contract back to their original size asair pressure
returns to normal. By disconnecting the infusion set and priming untildrops
appear, you can account for the bubble shrinkage and avoid potential
missedinsulin delivery.Before reattaching the infusion set to your body,
perform a tubing prime of at least2 units and observe drops exiting the
infusion set. The change in altitude mayincrease the likelihood of bubble
formation. Therefore, it is important to check forbubbles frequently during
and after air travel. Be sure to check your BG frequentlyduring air travel,
particularly after takeoff and landing.  Once again thank you for your
interest in Snap and please let us know if we can be of further assistance.

 Denise D.




> From: email @ redacted
> To: email @ redacted
> Subject: RE: [IP] Re: Disconnecting Pump for takeoff and landing
> Date: Thu, 13 Mar 2014 14:58:32 +0000
>
>  I only had an issue once, and that was when I took 11 flights over 2 days
> (requalifying for elite status - lol). I was consistently high those days,
but I
> attributed it to the alcohol I was drinking on the plane.
>
>  This is certainly an interesting article, and something someone who has a
high
> insulin sensitivity factor should keep in mind.
> ________________________________________
>  From: email @ redacted
<email @ redacted>
> on behalf of Susan Marshall <email @ redacted>
> Sent: Tuesday, March 11, 2014 4:15 PM
> To: email @ redacted
> Subject: [IP] Re: Disconnecting Pump for takeoff and landing
>
> Denise, I never disconnect before the flight or during landing and takeoff.
> Never had any problems! I fly often.
>
>
> Susan
> T1 for 60 years, with no complications!
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