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Re: [IP] shock symptoms



There are two things that can cause what you are describing which is known as
hypoglycemia unawareness.  The first (and most common) is that the severity of
hypo symptoms are linked to the degree and suddeness of the bg drop.  As your
blood sugars run consistently tighter and closer to the low edge (in the 70-90s
range, for instance) most of the the time, the drop is less severe and so the
symptoms take longer to appear and are less obvious.  This can be disconcerting
if you are used to a set of symptoms.  This lack of awareness can become an
especial problem if you are running low a good deal since you start walking
around low a lot without responding until you end up very very low with seizures
or other severe symptoms.  There are two general responses to this: 1). raise
your target levels a little (and blood test more often) and 2). to train
yourself to become more aware of subtler signs.  The second cause of
hypoglycemia unawareness is much more long term.  If you have started to have
autonomic neuropathy, your body sometimes looses some of its adrenal response to
hypos.  This can improve with tighter control.  Again, they generally treat this
by having you raise your target bgs.

Hope that helps,
Ruth

R Bonitz wrote:

> My dr has sggested that shock symptoms  are harder to detect when control is
> tightened. Can anyone confirm this? I've had a couple of "sneak attacks"
> since I've tried to tighten control. Also, what about alcohol. I like a
> glass of wine at dinner but  now wondering if that affects symptoms. Dr
> doesn't seem to think so??? Problems with this worry me as I am Considering
> the pump.
>
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Insulin Pumpers website http://www.insulin-pumpers.org/
for mail subscription assistance, contact: HELP@insulin-pumpers.org