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[IP] more on the insulin inhaler



More info on the insulin inhaler.

Kasey
email @ redacted


Courtbeat wrote:
> 
> Hi, all,
> 
> This was on our wire service at work last night. It's probaby on the net
> somwhere but I thought I'd share it with you all.
> 
> Lauren, thanks for the AP version. This is from the Sun-Sentinel of South
> Florida.
> 
> Janice
> 
> (I'm typing this in from a computer printout so I apologize for the typos that
> are sure to follow!).
> 
> FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. -- An experimental insulin inhaler worked just as well
> as injections in a study of diabetics, which was released Tuesday at the
> annual American Diabetes Association conference in Chicago.
> 
> If the inhaler is effective in large trials starting this fall, it may someday
> replace most or all of the daily shots that diabetics need, a University of
> Miami professor said in releasing the study.
> 
> ``This could dramatically change the way we treat diabetes,'' said Dr. Jay
> Skyler, lead researcher in the study. ``It would allow people who are afraid
> of injections - and not willing to take them - to get the best treatment.''
> 
> Needles are the biggest single obstacle to giving insulin to diabetics,
> especially among children, doctors said.
> 
> Instead of taking one to four injections a day, 60 diabetics in the study
> inhaled one or two puffs of a fast-acting powdered insulin with each meal.
> They also took their normal injection of long-acting insulin at bedtime.
> 
> The inhaler, which collapses to a tube of 4 by 1 and one half inches, is
> portable, easy to use and does not risk infections and bleeding. The plastic
> packets of powdered insulin do not need to be refrigerated.
> 
> ``I just love it,'' said Paul Metalis, an accountant from Florida who has used
> the inhaler for a year as part of the study. ``You can take it whenever you
> want to. I've inhaled in the middle of the Orange Bowl at a UM Hurricanes
> game.''
> 
> Metalis, 50, said some diabetics hate injections and won't take more than one
> a day, even though doctors say three or four is better.
> 
> The study looked at 120 adult patients, 70 with Type I and 50 with Type II.
> Half of each group in the study was randomly assigned to use inhalers, the
> rest to normal injections.
> 
> After three months, Skyler said blood levels had improved the same amount for
> all patients, indicating the inhaler worked for both groups.
> 
> Skyler said no patients felt side effects or discomfort. Metalis agreed.
> 
> The inhaler, being developed by Inhale Therapeutic Systems and Pfizer Inc., is
> to be tested on more than 1,000 patients starting in November. If successful,
> the device would be submitted for federal approval within a few years.
> 
> Questions to be answered include whether inhaled insulin works over a long
> period and for all  ages of patients, said Dr. Elliott Levy, an Aventura
> endocrinologist who advises the diabetes association.
> 
> Children could be taught to use the inhaler but not before age 8 or so, said
> Dr. Samuel Freedman, a pediatric endocrinologist at Joe DiMaggio Children's
> Hospital in Hollywood.
> 
> (My heart sank a little last night when I read the 8-year-old comment, but my
> attitude now is: Hey, just one doctor's opinion. Just look at the pump and
> little ones like Kayla on it!!!)
> 
> Janice

-- BEGIN included message

Hi, all,

This was on our wire service at work last night. It's probaby on the net
somwhere but I thought I'd share it with you all.

Lauren, thanks for the AP version. This is from the Sun-Sentinel of South
Florida. 

Janice

(I'm typing this in from a computer printout so I apologize for the typos that
are sure to follow!).

FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. -- An experimental insulin inhaler worked just as well
as injections in a study of diabetics, which was released Tuesday at the
annual American Diabetes Association conference in Chicago.

If the inhaler is effective in large trials starting this fall, it may someday
replace most or all of the daily shots that diabetics need, a University of
Miami professor said in releasing the study.

``This could dramatically change the way we treat diabetes,'' said Dr. Jay
Skyler, lead researcher in the study. ``It would allow people who are afraid
of injections - and not willing to take them - to get the best treatment.''

Needles are the biggest single obstacle to giving insulin to diabetics,
especially among children, doctors said.

Instead of taking one to four injections a day, 60 diabetics in the study
inhaled one or two puffs of a fast-acting powdered insulin with each meal.
They also took their normal injection of long-acting insulin at bedtime.

The inhaler, which collapses to a tube of 4 by 1 and one half inches, is
portable, easy to use and does not risk infections and bleeding. The plastic
packets of powdered insulin do not need to be refrigerated.

``I just love it,'' said Paul Metalis, an accountant from Florida who has used
the inhaler for a year as part of the study. ``You can take it whenever you
want to. I've inhaled in the middle of the Orange Bowl at a UM Hurricanes
game.''

Metalis, 50, said some diabetics hate injections and won't take more than one
a day, even though doctors say three or four is better.

The study looked at 120 adult patients, 70 with Type I and 50 with Type II.
Half of each group in the study was randomly assigned to use inhalers, the
rest to normal injections.

After three months, Skyler said blood levels had improved the same amount for
all patients, indicating the inhaler worked for both groups.

Skyler said no patients felt side effects or discomfort. Metalis agreed.

The inhaler, being developed by Inhale Therapeutic Systems and Pfizer Inc., is
to be tested on more than 1,000 patients starting in November. If successful,
the device would be submitted for federal approval within a few years.

Questions to be answered include whether inhaled insulin works over a long
period and for all  ages of patients, said Dr. Elliott Levy, an Aventura
endocrinologist who advises the diabetes association.

Children could be taught to use the inhaler but not before age 8 or so, said
Dr. Samuel Freedman, a pediatric endocrinologist at Joe DiMaggio Children's
Hospital in Hollywood.

(My heart sank a little last night when I read the 8-year-old comment, but my
attitude now is: Hey, just one doctor's opinion. Just look at the pump and
little ones like Kayla on it!!!)

Janice

-- END included message