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Re: [IP] News to me



There are no such things as "long chain monomers".  There could be short
chain polymers, but I believe the cartridges are polyethelene which doesn't
have much low molecular weight stuff in it.

There may be small amounts of lubricants present, though.  I can't imagine
this is any different than the exposure you would get from using prefilled
syringes, made from the same polymer.

After all we all wear these cartidges for up to five days(or more)  at body
temperature with no apparent ill effects.

Terry

----- Original Message -----
From: "Michael" <email @ redacted>
To: <email @ redacted>
Sent: Monday, July 09, 2001 7:20 PM
Subject: Re: [IP] News to me


> The supplier is sort of correct (almost). The plastic cartridges
> contain long chain monomers -- so does insulin but they are fairly
> stable in the plastic matrix. The only known(suspected) interactions
> are between Humalog and the tubing, not the cartridges. The one study
> I've read on the interaction with the cartridges showed very small --
> 1%ish -- changes in the insulin. The tubing is another matter and is
> suspected of being the culprit for the so-called "humalog
> sensitivity". Adding Velosulin to the mix is thought to  scoop up the
> interacting molecules and preventing them from binding with the
> humalog since they seem to like V or R better than H.
>
> email @ redacted
>
> > Regarding whether plastic cartridges should be prefilled, Shelia was
> > told by her supplier that they should not because the plastic
> > contains a protein that binds to the insulin, making it less
> > effective.  To which Terry replied:
> > >
> > > Plastic has no protein!!!
> > >
> > > Terry
> >
> > And Sheila responded thusly:
> >
> > > That's exactly what I said but I figured I better check this out just
to
> > > give her the benefit of the doubt.  I asked her to provide
documentation of
> > > the study she sited and she said she couldn't find it.  ????
> > >
> > > Disetronic said that that was false info.  She said that Disetronic
didn't
> > > know what they were talking about.  ?????  A little bold I say.
> > >
> > > I'll keep you all posted if the study ever turns up.
> > >
> > > Sheila
> >
> > My first impression is that Shelia's supplier is incorrect.  But,
> > while plastic doesn't contain protein, perhaps the lubricant
> > contains some protein, or perhaps the insulin binds some
> > non-proteinaceous component of the cartridge.  If insulin does bind,
> > then that binding would have to be either a very slow reaction or a
> > weak interaction.  Otherwise, such cartridges could not be used at
> > all.
> >
> > The real questions are:  Do you notice a difference in insulin
> > effectiveness between cartridges filled directly before use and
> > those stored for some time?  If you used any of the glass cartridges
> > that they sent, did that insulin seem more effective?  If the
> > answers to these questions are "No," then if there is binding of
> > insulin in the cartridge, it is not significant.
> >
> > --Tad Seyler
> > ----------------------------------------------------------
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> > HELP@insulin-pumpers.org send a DONATION
> > http://www.Insulin-Pumpers.org/donate.shtml
> >
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