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Re: [IP] Site Lump



James:

Based on my experience (see note to wm) I do believe control has something
to do with site infections.  In my case, once the infection began I almost
immediately had high blood sugars which in turn seemed to aggrevate the
infection and caused the BG's to go higher etc.

Again, due to your gender, you would not have this experience, but if my
BG's are above 20 (360) due to any number of reasons, illness, unknown
disconnection, forgetting to bolus, I can be guarnateed of a yeast
infection within a day.

The joys of a woman with diabetes!  (Actually I believe this should be
included in the list of complications!!! but most men prefer not to hear
about such things)

I can only assume that since that is also a type of infection, that site
infections would be somewhat more likely to occur in those people with
diabetes who have poor control.

My father, who has type two diabetes, had persistant infections on his legs
in the two years prior to being diagnosed.  I can only assume that the long
length of time it took for the infections to heal was due to the high
sugars he must have had.


Paula

----------
> From: James P Lyons <email @ redacted>
> To: email @ redacted
> Subject: Re: [IP] Site Lump
> Date: Wednesday, July 22, 1998 11:23 AM
> 

I left the site in for an extra day to see what would happen, been 
changing religiously after no more than 72 hours.  Well 2/3 of the way 
through the 4th day, I noticed when I bent down, or twisted, I was 
feeling the site, not the adhesive pulling on the skin, but the needle 
site.  A quick look at my belly through the clear plastic of the tender, 
low and behold, it was *real* red.  I went strainght home (was leaving 
work at this point) and changed.  Upon pulling the site out, a bit of 
fluid ozzed out, I whiped with alchohol, a looked it over...didn't look 
to bad, didn't really hurt much now that the needle was  out... figured I 
let it sit a day.  It cleared up. on its own, but I hate to think what 
might have happened had I left it in for oh... the rest of the day and 
through the night.  It could have been real bad.  If bactieria had gotten 
going in there, I would have had a problem, luckily, I didn't.

I doing real well on control right now...i don't think it has too much to 
do with it.  Cause its about leaving something in you for a while, not 
like a needle , its in, its out.  and introduced bacteria, will likely 
not have a safe place to 'hide' , unlike an irritated infusion site.

my .02

> 
> I wonder if infections are a real problem in well controlled pumpers.
> There is so much over emphasis on cleanliness, but most of us used to
reuse
> syringes, reuse lancets, inject through clothing, etc. and never have had
> problems.  How many on this list have ever had a real full blown site
> infection since going on the pump that your own immune system did not
> spontaneously clear up?
> -wm
> 
> <<<<<<<<<<<From: email @ redacted
> Subject: Re: [IP] Site Lump
> 
> In a message dated 7/21/98 8:25:26 PM Eastern Daylight Time,
email @ redacted
> writes:
> 
> <<  I would guess that our bodies are constantly fighting small
>  bacterial invasions and that when they loose we get what they call an
> infection.
> 
>  Seems like Barb might have real medical info here? >>
> Here goes....These site infections can develop into major abcesses that
if
> allowed to get out of hand, can lead to major systemic septic infections.
> (Total body infection in the blood stream)  As a diabetic, you have to be
> especially vigilant.  Those infection fighting white blood cells cannot
fight
> infection when BG is over 160-200 range (YMMV)  Depending on the
organism,
> especially some types of bacteria, glucose and insulin is used by those
little
> critters for their own growth, stealing your insulin and keeping your BG
up!
> So be careful with cleaning sites and be careful about how long you keep
one
> in place.  As a professional, I am obligated to advise my patients to
change
> sites every 2-3 days, depending on infusion device and insulin used.
(Keeps my
> malpractice insurance people happy!)  I do, however, know that not all
people
> choose to follow this advice.  Consider this...how much is a new set and
new
> site worth to you compared to the cost of a visit to the MD and the
antibiotic
> prescription?...or the cost of a hospital admission for a major infection
> treatment.  Septic shock is not a pleasant experience.  My apologies if
this
> upsets anyone.
> 
> Barbara B.>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
> 
> _____________
> Wayne Mitzner
> Department of Environmental Health Sciences
> The Johns Hopkins School of Hygiene and Public Health
> 615 N. Wolfe St.
> Baltimore, MD 21205
> Tel. 410 614 5446
> Fax 410 955 0299
> 
> 
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-- 
---------------------------------
James Lyons 
University of Pennsylvania School of Engineering and Applied Science
Computer Science Engineering Class of 2000

Honesty is the best policy, but insanity is the best defense
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