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Re: [IP] Self-testing at Camp



Alan,

    Can you make the case that b/c your son is taking responsible care of his
diabetes, he needs the tools to allow him to do so.  You might point out that
the 15 minutes it takes to get to the nurses office could be a serious problem
is he is actually low and doesn't test and react.   What if the nurse is not
instantly available for instance?  That could be a far bigger liability for
them.

    I taught at an elementary school for 12 months and I know that drugs etc are
very tightly regulated by schools.  As a teacher, they even made me teach people
how to give me glucagon, brief the classes about what to do (who to go get and
how) if I was hypo, etc and insist that I keep my stuff in a locked drawer.
However, I was also put in charge of some of my kids medicines which had to be
locked up between use.  Perhaps the better tactic would be to meet with the
teachers (supervisors) Ryan sees all day have him test with them and get them
real comfortable with the process.  Your probably best off only using a single
lancet and bringing it home to change monthly.  Then you could ask the head to
let each teacher take the meter and keep it in a locked drawer until he needed
it. If there are no drawers, it could go in a grown ups bag.

Good luck.  It gets pretty crazy!



Alan Shusterman wrote:

> I continue to be so impressed by the information I'm getting from this
> group (although, being away over the 4th, I'm a few days behind).  If
> this question has just been answered somewhere else, please just tell
> me when and where.
>
> A problem just arose at my son's camp.  It's a sports day camp.  Reed
> is 10 and went on the pump seven weeks ago.  For the last two years,
> he has been fortunate enough to have the freedom to do blood tests on
> his own at camp.  He'd go to the nurse at times, but at other times he
> would do his own tests.  The camp owner/director had not thought this
> through.  The nurses were ok with it.
>
> Today, a staff member at camp (a teacher or school nurse) brought up
> to the director how this would not be permitted at school, and the
> director immediately became terrified of the liability.  He worries
> that Reed might drop a lancet (which someone could step on or find and
> tell their parents) or there might be some problem with blood.  He
> believes there is only a one in a million chance of a problem, but a
> much greater chance that the appearance of a problem would make him
> liable.  Beginning tomorrow, he says, Reed must come to the nurse's
> office each time he needs to test.
>
> With the pump, and with us still trying to get the basal rate right,
> Reed now tests as follows:
>
>         When he wakes up  7 am
>         On the bus to camp  9:30
>         Before lunch  12:15 pm
>         Mid-afternoon 2:30 pm
>         Late afternoon (on bus)  4-5pm or
>         Arriving at home 5:15
>         etc.
>         He also has the option to test at any time:  he carries a Glucometer
> with him or can go to the nurse.
>
> The question is:  has anyone ever won this battle?  We lost it at
> school last year.  The local JDF director has no materials, although
> she is willing to talk to the director.  Has the ADA ever been used.
> We can't make this a Federal case because this is his last year at
> camp.
>
> I'd appreciate any help.
>
> Thanks.
>
> Alan
>
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