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Re: [IP] pets and hypoglycemia



Hi Kimberly-

Good luck with Vet school and getting your diabetic assistance dog
certified.  

I don't know if you were a member of pumper's list early this spring
when I posted this message:

I usually experience low bg only at night when I'm sleeping.   I 
always wake up with the assistance of my cat.  I have 2 cats.  My
siamese cat, Sasha, is MY kitty.  Tiger, cat #2, is devoted to my
husband and much prefers his lap over mine.  However, when my bg takes
a dive in the middle of the night, Tiger sits on my chest and DROOLS
buckets on my neck, face and ears!!  This only happens when my bg is
going low.  At no other time will Tiger sit on my lap or curl up in bed
with me.  Weird huh?  Guess those critters are pretty smart huh?

Tiger does this consistently.  Although I have only had 2 lows at night
since starting the pump in March.  Pre-pump, when I used NPH, night time
lows were pretty common for me.

Becky D.

Kimberly Davis wrote:
> 
> Okay, I know that some of you will think I'm nuts, but last night my dog
> woke me up again and insisted that I get up.  I tested at 42.  So far,
> since the dog has been sleeping in the room with me she has woke me up 7
> times.  Once she had to go out with diarhea, but all 6 other times she
> woke me up because I was low.  I don't usually wake  up when I get low,
> so she has probably prevented me from convulsing, or worse if no one
> heard the convulsions.  I may well owe my life to her.  This is not the
> first animal which has consistently forced me up when I have gone low
> over night.  My previous Shepherd and  a Staffordshire terrier before
> that, also would wake me when I became low.  This dog, however, seems to
> wake me sooner than either of the previous animals, so I am more
> coherent and able to resolve the problem when I am abrupty awakened.
> Most people wonder how an animal could possibly know my BS, but I've
> thought about that one.  My heart rate changes, my breathing increases,
> my body chemistry changes, so I must smell different, and I probably
> sleep differently.  How could an animal NOT notice.  This dog also
> becomes a pest as my blood sugar drops while I'm awake.  If I'm quite
> involved in something, sometimes I don't notice that I'm getting low,
> but she does, and she lets me know.  I have worked training assistance
> animals, so I have decided to try and certify her as an assistance
> animal in the state of CO.  I was wondering if anyone had ever heard of
> someone doing this.  The first seizure alert dogs for epileptics were
> laughed at, how could a dog predict a seizure?? but dog are between 95
> and 99% accurate at predicting seizures.  I was thinking that an alert
> animal could be invaluable for a brittle diabetic living alone, or for
> worried parents with a growing diabetic whos diabetes is not always
> predictable.  Has anyone else ever considered this possibility???  I
> don't get low over night often, but if she didn't wake me up, the
> results of an unpredictable low could be tragic.
> 
> Kimberly
> (A diabetic, and a dog trainer about to go off to school to become a
> veterinarian, hopefully with the first diabetic assistance animal.)
> 
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-- 
Becky Draper
Hammond, WI
email @ redacted


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