[Previous Months][Date Index][Thread Index][Join - Register][Login]
  [Message Prev][Message Next][Thread Prev][Thread Next]

RE: [IP] Some thoughts on pumping and licking one's finger

It's a fixed prime of 0.3 units for the needle
Reply-To: <email @ redacted>
From: "Hal or Jo" <email @ redacted>
Sender: <email @ redacted>
To: <email @ redacted>
Cc: <email @ redacted>, <email @ redacted>, <email @ redacted>
References: <email @ redacted>
Subject: [IP] Some thoughts on pumping and licking one's finger
Date: Sat, 4 Jan 2003 21:43:52 -0600
Message-ID: <02a301c2b46c$aa9b7e60$email @ redacted>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-1"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
X-Priority: 3 (Normal)
X-MSMail-Priority: Normal
X-Mailer: Microsoft Outlook Express 6.00.2800.1106
X-Authentication-Warning: pandora.is.bizsystems.com: majordomo set
  sender to email @ redacted using -f
X-MimeOLE: Produced By Microsoft MimeOLE V6.00.2800.1106
Importance: Normal

First let me state that I've been pumping almost seven years but I'm not
thoroughly familiar with the  operation of the MM Paradigm.  However, I do
have a couple of questions and comments.

>.....I prepare another site with a new quickset without priming, insert it
and then attach the old      > tubing to the new site.  I then prime the new
site and all is good.  I do not do this all the time, just > as needed in
order not to through away so much insulin.

Thats really interesting.  Are you saying that you prime after you've
connected the line to the set on your body?  If so, do you know how much of
the insulin used in priming the new set is entering your body?  When I
prime, I always have the line disconnected from the set, then after priming,
I connect them.

> Regarding prefiling your reservoirs, I was told by my CDE that I should
> do that since bacteria might grow on the surface and then they are
> introduced by the needle and then my sites might not last the whole 3 days
> without infection. Then again, you can say the same thing about the
>bottle which we just wipe with alcohol before refills.

As you said, there is no difference in storing insulin in pre-filled
cartridges/reserviors and in the vials the insulin comes in.  To be extra
safe one should, wipe the tops of the vials and reservoirs with an
antiseptic solution.  Insulin itself is a good bactericidal agent due to the
phenol and cresol in it.

> ... in order to avoid the reservoir going empty before I am ready to
change the site.
> I am wondering if anyone has tried to just insert a new site, without the
> tubing primed or connected to the pump, and then just connect the old
tubing to the new site?
> This is easy to do with the silhouettes, but I am not sure you can do it
with the quicksets.
> If you have ever done this, please let me know.

I presume you are using a new set and the line is still connected to the
pump with insulin in it?  I do this frequently with Ultraflex sets and

I also often let my reservoir/cartridge run dry before I change to a new
one.  I set the pump alarm  to sound off when it is getting low (my pump can
be set to alarm at the remaining volume of my choice) and I make sure that
when the alarm sounds/vibrates to tell me it is empty I'm ready to put in
another one.  I can't think of any reason not to do this.

> I recently started filling my reservoirs in advance - several at a time,
instead of filling them during
> a site change.  I feel like my sites are not lasting well, and am
wondering if storing the insulin in the > plastic reservoirs for an extra
week might cause the insulin to degrade.  I am wondering if anyone > else
pre-fills their reservoirs, and, if you do, do you have any problem with it?

I would purchase and use the reserviors/cartridges already prefilled with
insulin at the factory.  Unfortunately only Humalog is available prefilled
and I prefer Novolog.  So I set down and prefill 10 to12 at a time myself.

I've followed studies by biomedical researchers at Baylor University Medical
Center comparing storing blood for transfusion in plastic bags and glass
contaniers.  They both meet FDA standards and are safe, but we always found
some traces of plasticizers in the blood that was stored in plastic bags
and, of course, not in the blood stored in glass.  For that reason, I have
always used glass reservoirs/cartridges to hold the insulin in my pump.

Regarding licking ones finger to remove a remaining drop of blood.  Ugh!
Unless the finger has just been washed, one doesn't know for sure what is on
it and even if the finger is clean (certainly the blood is), I don't like
the idea of putting non-sterile body fluids out of my mouth on the open
wound.  It would be safer to urinate on your finger to wash the blood off
than to put it in your mouth because urine from a healthy person is sterile
and saliva is not. I'll stick to Kleenex and tolet paper. Thank you.

for HELP or to subscribe/unsubscribe, contact:
for HELP or to subscribe/unsubscribe, contact: