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Re: [IP] Re: Minimed's "so called" new technology, glucose monitor



I heard that the New Minimed Glucose Sensor will cost $4,500-$6,000
whenever it finally makes it to the market.. and you'll have to 
put another infusion away from your pump infusion to keep from getting
lower than normal readings.  It doesn't seem that promising...
I would much prefer the less invasive way to check with Integ or
something..  That's seem to be the stopgap technology that will hold us
through until Minimed can actually come up with something useful..
Forrest

Sbledsoe01 wrote:
> 
> To those buying off on the New Minimed Glocose sensor.   Before buying into
> this device, please do your homework on it.  Ask the Minimed rep to show it to
> you. Ask him/her to demonstrate it to you and your Dr.  Ask for the clinical
> data and the results.  How accurate is it and how often?
> 
> There are literally dozens of companies (worldwide) working on this
> technology, some with non-invasive technology, far superior to the more
> conventional invasive technology that they are promoting.  Please do your home
> work and don't just buy off on a "new" product for the sake of what Minimed is
> saying.  You owe it to yourself.
> 
> Another Glucose sensor,  which is non-invasive (does not break the skin) is
> close to submitting for FDA approval, but you don't hear much about them.
> 
> It is the GlucoWatch: (www.fluent.com)
> 
> Cygnus has developed a monitoring device called the GlucoWatch that is worn
> like a wristwatch, eliminating the need for patients to stab their fingers to
> obtain blood samples. The GlucoWatch extracts glucose molecules through intact
> skin via a proprietary electro-osmosis process that uses low levels of
> electric current. Glucose molecules are collected in a small disposable pad
> that adheres to the skin. The collected glucose triggers an electro-chemical
> reaction with a reagent in the pad, generating an electrical current. A sensor
> measures the current and an integrated circuit equates it to a concentration
> of glucose in the patient's blood.