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Re: [IP] # of Pumpers is growing!



Just as an FYI, while surfing one day, somewhere I saw
that Minimed has reached it's 100,000th pumper.  ;-)
kelly
--- email @ redacted wrote:
> I get a newsletter from Medscape every
> once-in-a-while just to keep up on th=
> e=20
> studies being done.
> 
> This was in the one I received this morning...looks
> like there are some=20
> 80,000 of us pumpers in the US alone!  Our numbers
> are growing!  That's=20
> 80,000 out of approximately 1 million insulin
> dependent diabetics in the US=20
> alone!  There has been a significant rise in the
> number since 1997.
> 
> The link is as the end of the article, but I don't
> know if you will be able=20
> to access the website...I have my password.  I cut &
> pasted the entire=20
> article below just incase you can't access the site.
> 
> Roxanne Vill=E1nueva RD, LD
> Cleveland, Ohio
> IDDM X 18+ years, pumping for 6+ years.
> Remember...Diabetics are naturally sweet!
> 
> 
> 
> From
> <A
>
HREF=3D"http://diabetes.medscape.com/SMA/SMJ/public/SMJ-journal.html">Sou=
> thern Medical Journal</A>=20
> 
> Reemergence of Insulin Pump Therapy in the 1990s
> 
> L. Raymond Reynolds, MD, Department of Internal
> Medicine, Division of=20
> Endocrinology and Molecular Medicine, University of
> Kentucky,=20
> LexingtonAbstract
> 
> The publication of the landmark Diabetes Control and
> Complications Trial=20
> results in 1993 provided a strong impetus to achieve
> near-normalization of=20
> blood glucose levels in type I diabetic patients
> using intensive insulin=20
> therapy programs. Recent studies show less
> hypoglycemia with this form of=20
> intensive therapy and equivalent or improved
> glycemic control. Insulin pump=20
> therapy is achieving wider acceptance and
> application in diabetes management=
> .=20
> This commentary reviews the current status of
> insulin pump therapy, includin=
> g=20
> indications and future directions. [<A
> HREF=3D"http://diabetes.medscape.com/=
> SMA/SMJ/public/archive/2000/toc-9312.html">South Med
> J</A> 93(12):1157-1161,=
>  2000. =A9=20
> 2000 Southern Medical Association]
> 
> Introduction
> 
> External insulin infusion pumps became generally
> available in the early=20
> 1980s, after initial studies suggested that
> normalization of blood glucose=20
> levels was possible in difficult-to-manage cases of
> insulin deficiency.[1-4]=
> =20
> Pump therapy was widely applied to the most
> difficult cases, including the=20
> most unstable from a metabolic standpoint.
> Frequently, psychosocial problems=
> =20
> emerged, precluding successful therapy.[5] The
> results were often=20
> unsatisfactory and occasionally disastrous, usually
> the result of unrealisti=
> c=20
> expectations or improper application of this
> technology.[6] Insulin pump=20
> therapy became obscured by controversy and was used
> in only a small minority=
> =20
> of patients by the late 1980s. However, the
> multicenter Diabetes Control and=
> =20
> Complications Trial (DCCT) data showed that
> intensive insulin therapy=20
> resulting in lower hemoglobin Alc (HbAlc) levels is
> associated with a=20
> reduction in risk for microvascular
> complications.[7] The intensive therapy=20
> group achieved an average reduction of 1.7% in HbAlc
> levels compared with th=
> e=20
> conventional therapy group. Patients receiving
> intensive therapy were treate=
> d=20
> either with insulin pump continuous subcutaneous
> insulin infusion (CSII) or=20
> with multiple daily injections (MDI) of insulin,
> with nearly 50% receiving=20
> CSII therapy during the study.[8] Adverse events
> associated with intensive=20
> therapy included severe hypoglycemia, diabetic
> ketoacidosis (DKA), and weigh=
> t=20
> gain. Although there was a twofold to threefold
> greater risk for hypoglycemi=
> a=20
> in the intensive treatment group, the absolute
> incidence declined in the=20
> latter years of the study. Both conventional and
> intensive treatment groups=20
> had weight gain, and the incidence of DKA was not
> increased with intensive=20
> therapy. Importantly, intensive therapy was not
> associated with a decline in=
> =20
> quality of life.[9] Therefore, the DCCT results
> prompted the American=20
> Diabetes Association to recommend that blood glucose
> control equivalent to=20
> that achieved with intensive insulin therapy be the
> goal for most patients=20
> with type 1 diabetes.[7] In the years before the
> release of DCCT data,=20
> insulin pump therapy was reserved primarily for an
> elite group of motivated,=
> =20
> compulsive patients, free of complications, at
> specialized diabetes centers.=
> =20
> The risk of hypoglycemia was believed to be so great
> that patients with=20
> hypoglycemic unawareness were generally excluded
> from this therapy.[10] Othe=
> r=20
> deterrents to insulin pump therapy included concerns
> about patient selection=
> =20
> criteria, pump reliability, and an increased risk of
> DKA and skin=20
> infections.[11-14]Studies have shown a reduced risk
> of hypoglycemia with pum=
> p=20
> therapy, with equivalent or lower HbAlc
> levels.[15-17] Increasing numbers of=
> =20
> patients are receiving this form of therapy. In
> 1997, a reviewer estimated=20
> that 10,000 to 20,000 individuals received pump
> therapy.[18] Current data*=20
> show a rapid growth in recent years, including
> approximately 80,000 pump=20
> therapy patients in the United States.   =20
> 
> 
> In a message dated 2/3/01 6:25:05 AM Eastern
> Standard Time,=20
> email @ redacted writes:
> 
> 
> 
> > REEMERGENCE OF INSULIN PUMP THERAPY IN THE 1990S
> > Review the current status of technology,
> indications, and future direction=
> s.
> > South Med J 93(12):1157-1161, 2000
> >
>
http://diabetes.medscape.com/33280.rhtml?srcmp=3Dendo-020201
> > <A
>
HREF=3D"http://diabetes.medscape.com/33280.rhtml?srcmp=3Dendo-020201">R=
> ead
> > it Here</A>
> >=20
> Return-path: <email @ redacted>
> From: email @ redacted
> Full-name: RoxanneRD
> Message-ID: <email @ redacted>
> Date: Sat, 3 Feb 2001 07:18:59 EST
> Subject: Re: Medscape's Diabetes and Endocrinology
> MedPulse 02-Feb-01
>   --Get Tarascon E...
> To: email @ redacted
> MIME-Version: 1.0
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"
> Content-Disposition: Inline
> X-Mailer: 6.0 sub 10502
> X-Converted-To-Plain-Text: from
> multipart/alternative by demime 0.97c
> X-Converted-To-Plain-Text: Alternative section used
> was text/plain
> 
> I get a newsletter from Medscape every
> once-in-a-while just to keep up on the
> studies being done.
> 
=== message truncated ===
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