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Re: [IP] Kaiser NW - New policy for hospital admittance for pumpers



 I was a lab rat at Mass General in an experiment where they had a dual IV with
both regular insulin,
 yes regular and sugar (not sure which form) and both were controlled by an
algorithm based on readings from a G4.
During the experiment they stressed me with carbs.
For the entire time period I was between 80-140.  Amazing.
 Hopefully this can get "approved" and exported. It was designed for people
undergoing surgery who couldn't manage on their own.
________________________________
From: Lola <email @ redacted>
To: "email @ redacted" <email @ redacted> 
Sent: Saturday, December 28, 2013 8:45 PM
Subject: Re: [IP] Kaiser NW - New policy for hospital admittance for  pumpers


Id fight it. Your less work as a patient if you can do your own " stuff". Your
more able to heal , for whatever reason if your BS is normal.
Why switch from one schedule ( the pump) to a complete new one for shots... For
what. 1 or 2 days ?

I can understand if your in a coma. Or major surgery .. But ... Even during my
surgery I wore my pump.

Lolita

<3

Sent from my iPhone

> On Dec 28, 2013, at 7:57 PM, "Annabella Lewis" <email @ redacted> wrote:
> 
> A few days before Christmas I received a letter from the Endocrinology
> department at Kaiser
> NW. It stated that I was receiving this letter because I use an insulin pump.
> It then detailed
> their new policy for hospital admittance for pumpers.
> 
> I quote:
> 
> "KPNW Hospitalsa have a strong commitment to excellent management of diabetes
&
> hyperglycemia for patients admitted to our hospitals. ....... Patients who
are
> acutely ill,
> sedated or in surgery are generally not able to saafely & adequately manage
> their pumps, &
> most hospital staff are not familiar enough with pump therapy to take over
> managing &
> troubleshooting your pump" 
> 
> I agree with most of the above. But it goes on:
> 
> "In most cases you will need to disconnect your pump upon admission to the
> hospital & give
> it to a family member for safekeeping" 
> 
> This is very black & white, w
 if I am admitted for a procedure that
> does not require
> full anaesthesia & I am perfectly awake, I would prefer to continue using
pump
> therapy with
> which I am familiar that go to MDI. In recovery after an operation, as soon
as
> I am able I want
> to take control of my own blood sugar testing & insulin dosing again & I can
do
> that better on
> the pump. They say the pump is to be disconnected on admission, they don't
> mention what
> alternate treatment will be provided. An hour or so later basal insulin will
> start to disappear.
> 
> What do other people think? Am I being stupid to be scared by this letter? Is
> this just Kaiser
> NW or do other Kaiser regions have similar policies? Do all hospitals have
such
> policies?
> 
> I see the Endo at the end of January so I want some ammunition to confront
him.
> 
> Annabella 
> .
> Follow us at https://www.twitter.com/insulinpumpers
> Make a long URL short at http://type1.org

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