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Re: [IP] not so fast



>  As a Type 1 I ran into this. My A1c pre-pump was in the 5-range. My 
>endo didn't
>think I needed a pump because, in his mind, I was already in good 
>control which
>was confirmed by the A1c. However, my daily bgs ranged anywhere from 30 to 300
>on a regular basis. I had always checked my bgs frequently because I could be
>fine one minute and crashing low the next, so I graphed all my bgs for a few
>days and my graphs looked like this /\/\/\/\/\/\/\.

This is why I disputed one question on the MM training website.  They 
counted as wrong my answer that finger sticks as well as a1c were 
needed to evaluate overall control.  I feel that overall control 
involves BOTH the average (a1c) and the variability--and since 
continuous real-time monitoring is still not a practical reality, 
finger sticks are important.  I first had a pump suggested when I 
meticulously wrote down every bite I ate for a couple of weeks, and 
my doctor at the time realized that though my breakfast and insulin 
were exactly the same every day, my finger-stick blood sugar could go 
up, down or sideways between pre-breakfast and pre-lunch.  I was 
having a lot of lows at that time, too (the most annoying being just 
AFTER I'd finished a meal) and that was when I was told NOT to get a 
pump because it would increase the probability of severe lows.  Thank 
goodness they finally figured out that wasn't true!
-- 
Sue Ann Bowling, North Pole, Alaska
http://mosquitonet.com/~sbowling (general)
http://bowlingsite.mcf.com/DogPage.html (dogs)
http://climate.gi.alaska.edu/Bowling/Bowling.html (professional--retired)
.
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