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RE: [IP] Minimed static problems



Did the engineer you spoke with know about the internal circuitry inherent
to Minimed pumps?

Does the engineer you spoke with know about statistics?  If Minimed has 80
percent of the market share (which they do) that means that they sell 80
pumps to every one of their competitors.  With that many pumps on the
market, would it not look like a poor design if more of the Minimed pumps
failed due to ESD?

Let's see, if I have 80 chevrolets on the road and 5 Fords, if one of the
Fords has transmission trouble, would it look better than 5 Chevrolets
having the same type of trouble?  But what percentage of Ford owners would
be  on the side of the road compared to the Chevy owners.  If these numbers
equate out to the 150,000 pump users out there and Minimed has sold 80
percent of them, of course it will look like a worse design.

Bill, if you go to a Ford dealership, do you honestly think that the Ford
dealer is going to speak honestly on the Chevy?

I have not spoken to one engineer for a insulin pump company but I have
dealt with hundreds of engineers in my career with the FAA and believe it or
not when it comes to design, there is hundreds of opinions.  But I doubt it
if Minimed, Animas, Deltec or anyone is going to tell you "how their boards
actually work"

Please, give me a break ok?

Mark
-----Original Message-----
From: email @ redacted
[mailto:email @ redacted]On Behalf Of William Seward
Sent: Monday, December 01, 2003 9:25 PM
To: email @ redacted
Subject: [IP] Minimed static problems

Hi all
 I inquired to a couple of pump manufacturers about the static discharge on
my
Minimed pump. Here is a reply from an engineer that designs insulin pumps
for
one of the top manufacturers.

 ...Not all devices are equal with respect to withstanding ESD
(ElectroStatic
Discharge). While the individual electronic components are essentially
equivalent in all pumps, it is how they are arranged on the circuit board
and
the additional protection circuitry that makes all the difference in the
world.
There are many sophisticated methods to prevent the electronic component
from
failing when a pump is exposed to ESD. Some of them involve internal
grounding
planes, energy damping capacitors, and routing of sensitive traces to name a
few. The key to resisting ESD is not in preventing exposure to static
clothing
and environment. It is in adhering to good design practice, that is creating
insulin pump electronics and housing designs that withstand conditions
specified
in the applicable international standards! Medtronic-MiniMed apparently does
not
understand that greater protection can be obtained through good product
design.
The main reason for not adhering to these acc!
 epted
  practices is cost saving measures as a total redesign is necessary. This
is
one reason the Medtronic fails when exposed to ESD.

Any thoughts?



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