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Re: [IP] Dental surgery on the pump



Too bad you had so much trouble because I have been hospitalized twice in
the past two years and without signing anything, I was always allowed to
do my own blood sugars and shots.  I was even allowed to figure out how
much insulin to take.  One hospital was the Cleveland Clinic and the
other was one in Virginia Beach.  I was treated VERY well at both places.

I need to have a wisdom tooth pulled soon.  Has anyone out there had an
operation like that while wearing the pump?  I wonder if more insulin is
needed (?).  I have only been on the pump for 10 days now, so I am kind
of new at this.  

Yesterday the pump alarm went off during dinner.  It scared the living
daylights out of me!  I JUMPED!  Then hurried to look on the alarm sheet
I was given and found the sheet to be inadequate and decided to call the
800 number.  I still don't know why it happened, but I changed the
infusion set and proceeded to eat my dinner.  Needless to say, my blood
sugars weren't good for several hours.  The cause may have been due to
the tight belt I was wearing which may have pinched the tubing.  Anyone
else have this problem or is this one of those things that could only
happen to me?

Sally
On Wed, 3 Dec 1997 15:50:08 -0800 (PST) Buzz Haughton
<email @ redacted> writes:
>Sara et al.,
>
>I read Dr. Richard Bernstein's new book _Dr. Bernstein's Diabetes
>Solution_ several months ago. Whether you agree with his 
>recommendations
>(actually they're more like commands :-{)) on diet or not, he does 
>make
>several very cogent observations we all could profit from. One of them 
>is
>that if you are going to be hospitalized it is very important to work 
>out
>an agreement with your doctor(s) beforehand that you will be the one
>responsible for keeping your DM under control and that no one may 
>fiddle
>with your program. This agreement should be executed in writing, and 
>all
>nurses and other health professionals who will deal with you should 
>have
>copies of it. 
>
>I wish I had had enough presence of mind to have done this the last 
>time I
>was hospitalized. The attending physician wrote "no insulin if BG < 
>300
>mg/dL" (!) on my chart, and the nurses stuck to it. They also wouldn't 
>let
>me check my own BG or give my own shots. :-{( It will be different the
>next time!  
>
>Buzz
>email @ redacted
>
>