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[IP] Fwd: THE WATCH(glucosensor)




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Anyone else heard about this?  Don't know who the author is...it was forwarded
to me by another mom of a diabetic.

Kasey

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JUST THOUGHT YOU ALL MIGHT BE INTERESTED!  

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CURRENT INFO:


This is the shor t
version of the story below.  Yesterday I was afforded
the opportunity to test the proposed diabetes "watch".  It is a great
piece of equipment, new and very high tech.  I have not been shown the
results of my lab blood tests and what the results of the watch tests
were, probably won't be, but the scientist said the results were in his
opinion better than what the glucose meters provide, so approximately 90
+ % accuracy.  It has a small screen so you can see the read out and has
the possibility set low and high warning alarms for the wearer.  This
instrument, if it catches on, if the HMO's will providde it and provide
the sensors it will need, will quite possibly revolutionize how we
diabetics go about our lives.

The details of the trial which took place yesterday, Good Friday. 

I was amazed at the testing for the soon to be proposed diabetes "watch"
will measure glucose levels witnin the layers of skin from two to three
time per hour.  There is the capability for the watch to be set by the
user for a LOW bs and a high BS reading.  Such a device could have its
data downloaded into a system for the docs and they could plot your bs
levels for every 14 hours yu wore the watch.  The user of course, can be
warned when the levels go low or high so they could take action.  This
system is really novel and the watch is really a ultra tiny computer
with sophisticated software and programming.
 
I spoke with the RN directing the research part of the program in the
field and one of the scientists in on calibration and such.  This
equipment has, in my opinion, the opportunity to revolutionize how we
diabetics test and track our blood sugar levels.  It is all so done with
a very minimum of invasion.  On the back of the device are two "sensor
pads" (my words) which must be changed out every 12 to 14 hours.  It
seems that at this time it is limited.  However the scientist mentioned
thrid and fourth generation devices and that it looked like the company
was going to the FDA for product approval in the last quarter of 1998.

The nurseing staff present to monitor us was the greatest.  We each had
a shunt installed in our wrists/arms so they could readily draw blood
for the lab testing and also do a simultaneous check of the BS levels
using a One Touch meter and strips.
 
For 14 hours we were watched, fed, and questioned about how we were
doing and how the devices felt and so on.  Every 30 minutes each person
and there were four of us, one t-1 and 3 t-2'a gave about one ounce of
blood for the lab and had our BS levels metered and then simply wait
till the next round.   We did this from 6:30 check in time, testing
began 7:00 and ended at 9:PM last night.
 
When the watches were removed the areas where we had "worn" the watches
were closely inspected by the techs and nurses and we have been
instructed to call and report whatever our watch sites look or feel like
on Sunday and again on Minday.  The watches have  very small amount of
electrical current which is how they operate.  At first it gets your
attention as it is somewhat like a mosquito bite, at time passes it
fades into the back ground.  My left arm was just a bit red and had a
few mini-welts.  Today it is no problem, however where the shunt was is
all black and blue.

The nurse dircting the testing program, an employee of the Contra Costa
Medical Group, in Concord, CA is also a trained diabetic nurse educator.
I have met a few such nurses in my lime as a diabetic, but this woman
stands head and shoulders above all the others.  Since I have been
experiencing what I thought and the docs too, as insulin reisistance I
have taken as much as 600 units of insulin a day, back some time.
Yesterday Carolyn Biondo with my obvious willing cooperation spent time
doing extra things with my insulin and carb intake and so on.
 
What happened was a real eyeopener for me.  I now take my boluses of
Ultralente in the morning and evening, but I used for example 7 units
of  Humalog this morning and when awoke my BS was 105, I ate and two
hours later my BS was 105 with my having taken 7 units of Humalog.
NOrmally I would have taken 30 or 40 units, but Carolyn just tole me
that there was far more insulin in my blood stream than needed and that
was setting up resistance.  Now I am very anxious to see how this all
works, I might be able to reduce my insulin requirement to 150 units a
day, or even less as time passes.  MY time at the center was very well
worth the boredom and discolored wrist for some invaluable help I
received in understanding my disease better than I had.

Love and LIght to each of you and Happy holidays

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